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OOK 1955 



• #! MASSACHUSETTS 
HpRTICllLTURAL SOCIETY 
PRICE ONE DOLLAR 













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cz 1955 

FLOWER SHOWS 



Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 






JANUARY 20 and 21 
Camellia Show 

MARCH 13 to 19 (Mechanics Bldg.) 
Spring Show 

MAY 2 and 3 
Daffodil Show 

MAY 19 and 20 
Tulip Show 

JUNE 9 and 10 

/m Show 

JUNE 20 and 21 
i?0S£ Show 

JULY 12, 13 and 14 

L/7j/ Show 

AUGUST 19 and 20 
Gladiolus Show 

AUGUST 24 and 25 
Exhibition of the Products of Children's Gardens 

OCTOBER 5, 6 and 7 

Harvest Show 

NOVEMBER 10 to 13 
Chrysanthemum Show 

(Dates subject to change) 



1955 YEARBOOK 

of the 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS 
for 

1954 

AND A LIST OF BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 



FOREWORD • The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the honor 
to present herewith the 32nd number of the Society's Yearbook, with which 
are combined the annual reports for the year 1954. 

Boston, Massachusetts, September 1, 1955 Stedman Buttrick, Chairman 




Bachrach 



Mr. Harold W. Knowlton 
Elected a Trustee, May 2, 1955 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 

President's Address 9 

Report of the Secretary 12 

Results of the Balloting 16 

Report of Exhibitions Committee 18 

Report on Children's Gardens 18 

Report of Library Committee 19 

Report of Prize Committee 20 

Garden Committee Awards 23 

Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 24 

Portraits of New England Horticulturists 28 

Flowers in Art and Decoration 30 

Gardens and Greenhouses of Col. Perkins 34 

Special Medal Awards 39 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1954 . . . 44 

Albert C. Burrage Library 50 

Report of the Treasurer 52 

Books Added to the Library 56 

Necrology 63 

Honorary Members 64 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 68 



Front Cover Illustration 

Circular reflecting pools with copper-colored ivy trellises of spiral design were 
used to accent the floral fantasies, which were suspended from the ceiling, as part of 
"Loan Exhibition of Flowers in Art and Decoration." 

Back Cover Illustration 

Detail from Chippendale tray, featuring handsome bouquet of roses, fuchsias, 
morning glories and other exotic plants, loaned by Mrs. John S. Ames, as part of 
"Loan Exhibition of Flowers in Art and Decoration." 

The photographs for the 1955 Yearbook are the work of Paul E. Genereux, 
except where otherwise designated. 




Vice-President Oliver Wolcott presents the Albert G. Burrage Gold Vase, 
awarded to the Special Committee on the 125th Anniversary of the Mas- 
sachusetts Horticultural Society, to Seth L. Kelsey, Chairman, for the 
most outstanding exhibit in 1954 — "Loan Exhibition of Flowers in Art and 

Decoration" 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 

Vice Presidents 

OLIVER WOLCOTT 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Trustees 
John S. Ames* Seth l. kelsey (1957) 

Ernest Borowski (1956) Harold w. knowlton (1958) 

Albert C. Burrage (1957) Mrs. William A. Parker (1957) 

Aubrey b. Butler (1958) Mrs. James Perkins (1958) 

George w. Butterworth (1958) Harold s. Ross (1956) 
stedman buttrick* harold d. stevenson (1956) 

Dr. George o. Clark (1958) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1956) 

Edward Dane (1957) Mrs. Edwin S. Webster (1956) 

walter hunnewell (1957) oliver wolcott* 

Donald Wyman (1958) 

Treasurer 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Assistant Treasurer 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 

* Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 

5 




Vice-President Oliver Wolcott presents the President's Cup to Mr. Fred 
Carter for an Arizona Desert Garden, the most meritorious exhibit at the 

Spring Flower Show 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 1, 1956 



Executive Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Finance Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

Budget Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

Membership Committee 

SETH L. KELSEY, Chairman 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 

Committee on Exhibitions 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK 
EDWARD DANE 



EDWARD DANE 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 



HAROLD S. ROSS 



EDWARD DANE 
SETH L. KELSEY 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH, Chairman 

MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
HAROLD D STEVENSON 

Committee on Prizes 



HAROLD KNOWLTON 



DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 



ERNEST BOROWSKI, Chairman 
THOMAS MILNE, Co-Chairman 



JAMES METHVEN 
Committee on Library 



MILFORD LAWRENCE 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 



MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 



Committee on Lectures and Publications 
ALBERT C. BURRAGE 



STEDMAN BUTTRICK, Chairman 

AUBREY B. BUTLER 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 



Committee on Special Medals 
HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 



SETH L. KELSEY 
HAROLD KNOWLTON 



MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
MRS. JAMES PERKINS 



Committee on Gardens 
OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 



HAROLD D. STEVENSON 
DR. DONALD WYMAN 



Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 



MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 



OLIVER WOLCOTT 



Committee on Building 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR HENRY G. WENDLER 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 



Nominating Committee 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE 
EDWARD DANE 



MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

7 



MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
MRS. JAMES PERKINS 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 
SETH L. KELSEY 




Milne 



Seth L. Kelsey presents the George Robert White Medal of Honor to Dr. 
Richard P. White, executive secretary of the American Association of 

Nurserymen 



8 




Reports of Officers and Committees 
Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 2, 1955 

The Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was held at 
Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 2, 1955, at 3:00 P.M., with the Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mr. Oliver Wolcott, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Mrs. Claire 
Rochefort, Mrs. Barbara Parsons, Miss Mary Kelly and Mr. George Taloumis. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the meeting. 
By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous Annual Meeting was waived. 
The following addresses and reports were read: 



The President 's Address 

"ith the completion of our 125th Anniversary, we now look forward 
to a new era of growth and progress. As I look back over my years 
of service to the Society, I am greatly impressed with its growth. 
When I became treasurer in 1922, the Society had 1,075 members. At that 
time, the greater proportion of our members held life membership in the 
Society. Today, we have over 15,000 members, but only about 5% are life 
members. The vast majority are on an annual basis. Yet, 86% of these renew 
annually, which speaks well of the services which we render. 

In looking ahead to the future, it is easy to see that our flower shows will 
continue to attract the public in great numbers. This year, we had approxi- 
mately 1,700 more in attendance at our Spring Show than last year. 

Again I look back to 1922. At that time, we had not made the connection 
with Mr. Farrington, who brought us Horticulture. When we started with 
the magazine in 1923, there were about 2,000 subscribers, in addition to our 
members, who received the magazine every two weeks. In October 1953, the 
magazine had a circulation of approximately 37,000. Today, with the advent 
of color, it has grown to 74,000. To be sure, it has been a source of expense to 
us, but it has also been of great service to our members and to thousands of 
gardeners throughout the country. Horticulture magazine has helped spread 
the name and fame of the Society — a service which we trust it will continue 
to render in the future. It is my hope that it may be published without excessive 
cost to the Society, as our subscriptions increase. 

Our Library is in excellent condition and contains as representative and as 
complete a collection of books on gardening and related fields as may be found 
anywhere in the United States. 

One of the prime services of the Society involves the answering of thousands 
of questions asked each year by our members and the general public either by 
telephone, mail or personal interviews. Other services include the recognition 
of outstanding gardens, awards to distinguished horticulturists, lectures and 
special courses in gardening for our members. These are a never ending source 
of satisfaction to all who benefit from them. 



THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

We are housed comfortably in a conveniently located building and we can 
look ahead to the future with assurance. Yet, we must ever be mindful of the 
need to broaden our services by increasing our membership and at the same 
time to provide all the stimulus needed for the advancement of horticulture. 

Our Society is a vast business enterprise with many ramifications which will 
be presented to you by our Executive Secretary. His report covers much more 
concretely than I have, the highlights of an eventful year. 

I would be remiss indeed if I did not express my heartfelt appreciation to 
the Trustees for their splendid cooperation in all our activities, to the members 
of the staff for their loyal devotion to duty and to all who have helped the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society in the past year. 

John S. Ames 
President 




Mrs. Irving C. Wright receives the Large Gold Medal of the Society from 
Seth L. Kelsey for developing and executing plans for Spring Flower Shows. 

10 




Cushing 

Specimen kurume hybrid azalea from the collection exhibited by Ernest Borow- 
ski at the Camellia Show. Awarded a Cultural Certificate 



11 



Report of the Secretary 

My report covers our 125th Anniversary Year, one of the busiest and 
most eventful years the members of the staff and your Secretary 
have experienced, but also one that proved most satisfying and 
inspiring. The highlight of our Anniversary activities was the magnificent 
Loan Exhibition of Flowers in Art and Decoration, staged in Horticultural 
Hall from October 24 through November 3, by the Society's Anniversary 
Committee headed by Mr. Seth L. Kelsey and designed by Mrs. Irving C. 
Wright. 

Additional Anniversary functions included an Open House and tea, at 
the time of the Annual Tulip Show on May 11, 1954. Tea was served to over 
300 friends and members of the Society. 

The Committee on Lectures and Publications also focused its attention on 
our Anniversary Year by selecting the best available authorities on horticulture 
for both the Spring and Winter series of Lectures. The lectures are becoming 
increasingly popular. On two occasions, we had to turn people away, an 
embarrassing situation for the Society. The series included: 

"Rhododendrons in Scotland" by E. H. M. Cox, Glendoick, Perth, 

Scotland 
"The Charm of European Gardens" by Dr. E. K. Thomas, Secretary, 

Rhode Island Horticultural Society 
"South African Flowers at Home" by Dr. Walter H. Hodge, Bureau of 

Plant Introduction, U. S. D. A. 
"The Alps in Flowers" by Miss Alice Chauncey, Noted Lecturer, New 

York City 
"Gardens of Enchantment from India to New Zealand" by Mrs. A. F. 

Burkett, Horticulturist, Cleveland Garden Center, Cleveland, Ohio 
"Wildflowers for Your Garden" by Mrs. Helen Hull, Boonton, New 

Jersey 
"Flowers for Summer and Winter Bouquets" by Mrs. Ruth Gannon, 

Woodbury, Connecticut 
"New Beauty from Bulbs" by George H. Pride, Worcester, Massachusetts 
"Outstanding Trees and Shrubs" by George Taloumis, Massachusetts 

Horticultural Society 
"The Secret Life of the Mushroom" by Dr. John R. Raper, Department of 

Botany, Harvard University 
"Worthwhile Perennials" by Roderick Cumming, Bristol, Connecticut 
Our 125th Anniversary is amply recorded in a volume called "Twenty-Five 
Historic Years", prepared by Mr. E. I. Farrington, our former Executive 
Secretary. No one was better equipped to do this history than Mr. Farrington, 
and the Society is deeply indebted to him for this excellent book. 

The Society served as host to the Ninth Annual American Horticultural 
Congress when it met in Boston, October 27 to 30. The delegates from various 
sections of the United States, representing 50 Societies and half a million 
gardeners, were entertained at tea in the Trustees' Room. They were also 
special guests at the Loan Exhibition of Flowers in Art and Decoration, which 

12 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

greatly added to the prestige of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and 
made a lasting impression on the delegates. 

Citations presented by the American Horticultural Council at its Presidents' 
Dinner included an award to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society on its 
125th Anniversary. The citation was presented by Dr. John C. Wister, Director 
of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Foundation, and accepted by our Society's President, 
Mr. John S. Ames. 

At the Council's Annual Banquet, Mr. George Taloumis, Executive Editor 
of Horticulture, was the speaker and gave an illustrated lecture about un- 
usual plants. This was one of the outstanding features of the four day Congress. 

During the past year, Horticulture observed its 50th birthday, highlighted 
by a Golden Anniversary Issue for the month of October. To commemorate 
this occasion, citations were awarded by Horticulture to five of the nation's 
leading horticultural editors: including Richardson Wright, former Editor 
of "House and Garden"; E. L. D. Seymour, Garden Editor of "American 
Home"; James H. Burdett, Director of the National Garden Bureau, Chicago, 
Illinois; Fred F. Rockwell, Senior Editor of "Flower Grower", and Edward 
I. Farrington, former Editor of Horticulture and Secretary of the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society. These awards were presented by Mr. Daniel 
J. Foley, Editor of Horticulture, during the American Horticultural Congress 
at its "Meet New England" Luncheon, presided over by your Secretary who 
served as General Chairman of the Congress. Mr. Seth L. Kelsey, one of our 
Trustees, was the principal speaker at this luncheon honoring 25 leading 
New England horticulturists. 

Coming to routine matters of the Society, I am happy to report that we 
now have more than 15,500 members, the largest number in the history of 
the Society. We are constantly striving to increase our membership, to add to 
our revenue and to expand our services. It is well known that there are thou- 
sands of people throughout New England who do not yet know that member- 
ship is available to them. To clarify this situation, may I appeal to you to 
acquaint your friends and neighbors with the advantages they may enjoy as 
members of our Society. 

The response to our magazine Horticulture in all parts of the United States 
and Canada is most gratifying. Since adding color illustrations in 1953, we 
have more than doubled our circulation. At the present time, we have 74,000 
subscribers. The returns from subscriptions and advertising, however, are still 
not sufficient to cover the cost of editing, printing and distributing the maga- 
zine. At the present time, this segment of the Society's activities is being care- 
fully studied by the Committee on Publications, the auditing department 
and the editorial staff. I should also report that the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society is again including a subscription to Horticulture as one of the services 
to its members. 

It pleases me to report that the recent Spring Flower Show was highly 
successful. Attendance was the second highest in the history of our Spring 
Shows, with more than 126,000 visitors. As a result, our financial returns are 
slightly higher than last year. You will receive additional information on this 
important project from Mr. George W. Butterworth, Chairman of the Com- 

13 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

mittee on Exhibitions. At this time, I would like to express my sincere apprecia- 
tion to Mr. Daniel J. Foley and Mr. George Taloumis for their untiring efforts 
and efficiency in handling the Flower Show publicity. 

Horticultural Hall continues to be one of the most important centers for the 
dissemination of horticultural information in the country. The Garden Club 
Federation of Massachusetts recently completed its fifth Judging School in our 
building. Candidates who successfully complete the course are known as 
accredited judges and are authorized to judge at any flower show in Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Mrs. Winifred Teele, the Director of the Boston School of Flower Arrange- 
ment, conducts a spring and fall course at Horticultural Hall. These classes are 
extremely popular and Mrs. Teele requires all pupils to become members of 
the Society. Mrs. Teele is one of the pioneers in this field and deserves great 
credit for her work and her loyalty and interest in the welfare of the Society. 

Mr. Albert C. Burrage, the Chairman of the Library Committee, has 
instituted many changes and improvements. A new bookcase has been installed 
in the Trustees' Room, which made it possible to put books into active circula- 
tion that were in storage because of lack of shelf space. All the books from the 
famous Burrage collection have now been made available to the public. The 
library has also been made more cheerful through the use of potted plants and 
cut flowers. Many additional changes and improvements are anticipated by 
the Library Committee, including new trophy cases, more comfortable chairs, 
new lighting fixtures and, as funds permit, an air conditioning system. Miss 
Dorothy Manks, our Librarian, has made a careful survey of some of the 
contemplated improvements and has visited several outstanding libraries. 

Two years ago, the Committee on Building engaged a contractor to check 
on the stone ornaments and replace the mortar which had disintegrated between 
the bricks of the building. This work has now been completed on three sides, 
namely on Norway Street, Massachusetts Avenue and Huntington Avenue. 
This leaves only the rear of the building, which is in fairly good condition. 

The rapid growth of some of the departments, especially Horticulture, 
made it necessary to provide more office space for employees. To meet this 
need, we converted one large office and a passageway into four small but 
comfortable rooms. As a result, Miss Newton, Mr. Foley, Mr. Husselbee 
and Mr. Pausch, who occupy these new offices, can function more efficiently 
and with fewer interruptions. We extend to you an invitation to visit our new 
offices on the second floor after this meeting or any time you wish. 

With the increase in circulation, the stencil room on the third floor also 
outgrew its quarters. The equipment has been moved to the room known as 
the Green Room on the third floor. It is a large, comfortable room, with space 
for expansion. The smaller vacated room now houses the halftones used as 
illustrations in Horticulture. 

The activities of the members of the staff have been varied and interesting. 
Every mail brings hundreds of letters from members and subscribers from all 
over the United States, and foreign countries as well, who desire information 
on some horticultural subject. The questions cover all phases of the broad 
field of horticulture, including woody plants, lawns, fruits, vegetables, peren- 

14 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 

nials, annuals, bulbs, house plants, greenhouses, soils, design, propagation 
as well as pests and diseases. There is great emphasis on plant identification, 
cultural requirements and sources for a wide variety of plant material. This 
department has grown tremendously in recent years so that it keeps the staff 
busy throughout the year. Mr. Taloumis handles most of the correspondence. 

To keep abreast of the changing conditions in the horticultural field, the 
members of the staff attend as many meetings in various parts of the country 
as time and finances will permit. Last July, our Editor Mr. Foley attended the 
Annual Meeting of the North American Lily Society in Seattle, Washington. 
On this trip, he also visited many of the important lily growers in both Wash- 
ington and Oregon. Last month, Mr. Foley journeyed to Cleveland, Ohio, 
where he lectured on "Color in the Garden", before the members of the 
Cleveland Garden Center. 

Mr. Taloumis, our Executive Editor, represented the Society at the Conven- 
tion of the Men's Garden Clubs of America in Houston, Texas. While in the 
South, he also visited Bellingrath Gardens, as well as many of the fine old 
gardens in New Orleans. Mr. Husselbee is compelled to make frequent trips 
to the principal cities of the country in behalf of Horticulture. Your Secretary 
served as a judge at the recent Detroit Spring Flower Show and attended the 
Directors' Meeting of the American Horticultural Council in New York and 
Washington, D. C. 

Under new activities for the year, I should mention that the North American 
Lily Society, of which your Secretary is President, will hold its Annual Meeting 
and Lily Show in Boston, July 12, 13 and 14, 1955. Another item of interest is 
that the Annual June Flower Show has been scheduled as two exhibitions 
this year — an Iris Show, scheduled for June 9 and 10, and a Rose Show, 
scheduled for June 20 and 21. This change was made by the Committee on 
Exhibitions because the June Show dates in the past were too late for iris, 
yet too early for roses. Space will be provided at both shows for other seasonal 
material in the way of flowering shrubs, plants, peonies and other cut flowers. 

For years, there has been an increased demand on the part of members of 
our Society for an elementary course in gardening. It was difficult to find the 
right person to teach the course, but we finally selected Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor 
of Dover, President of the New England Wild Flower Preservation Society, 
who was willing and competent to undertake the project. She taught several 
classes in the afternoon and evening which were highly successful and well 
attended. Each course consisted of 5 two-hour meetings at Horticultural Hall, 
plus a field trip to her greenhouse and pit garden in Dover. 

In conclusion, I would like to say that even though this has been one of the 
busiest years in the history of the Society, it has also been one of the most 
gratifying because of the wonderful cooperation given me by the Trustees, 
Officers and the Chairmen and members of the various Committees. To the 
members of the staff, I wish to express my heartfelt thanks for their loyalty and 
efficient service. The teamwork and tireless efforts of the entire organization 
was never more evident than during our 125th Anniversary Year. 

Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 

15 



Results of the Balloting at the Annual Meeting 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 63 votes having been cast, and the 
following persons were declared elected: 
President: John S. Ames 
Vice-President: Stedman Buttrick 

Trustees: (For three years) Mr. Aubrey B. Butler, Mr. George W. Butter- 
worth, Dr. George O. Clark, Mrs. James Perkins, Dr. Donald Wyman 
and Mr. Harold Knowlton. 




Arrangement of white giant camellias exhibited by Mrs. Irving C. Wright. 
Given a Special Award at the Camellia Show 

16 




Arno H. Nehrling presents citations to five outstanding editors. Left to right 

are President John S. Ames, E. L. D. Seymour, James H. Burdett, Fred F. 

Rockwell, Arno H. Nehrling, Carl Wedell, President, American Horticultural 

Council, E. I. Farrington, and Daniel J. Foley 




Fay Photos 

Arno H. Nehrling, Executive Secretary, receives plaque "for outstanding 
service to the cause of home beauty" from Walter Roozen of the Associated 

Bulb Growers of Holland 

17 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

Your Exhibition Committee this year consisted of: 

Mrs. William A. Parker 

Mr. Seth L. Kelsey 

Mr. Harold D. Stevenson 

Mr. Edward Dane 

Mr. George W. Butterworth 

Mr. John S. Ames 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling 

We report a very good year. Nine shows were held with an increase in 
attendance in seven. We also report additional income. 

The 125th Anniversary Exhibition last fall which incorporated some use of 
fall flowers such as we formerly used in the Chrysanthemum Show was a ven- 
ture in honor of our Anniversary Year and gave great credit to our Society as 
well as all who joined in producing it. 

The Spring Show again was probably our best ever, based on customer 
acceptance. We had a challenge to meet and we succeeded. 

Everything that we tried to do last year was done a little more efficiently 
this year and our thanks go to all who helped us do the job so well. 

George W. Butterworth, Chairman 
Committee on Exhibitions 

Report of the Committee on Children 's Gardens 



y \i njhe 1954 children's show was one of the largest and finest ever held. 
Entries totaled 1682, an increase of 387 or 22.1% over 1953. The 1945 
-*■*- Show at the climax of the World War II Victory Garden era had a 
total of only 1535 entries. If the season had been favorable for the ripening of 
tomatoes and the two ripe tomato classes had the usual 80 or 90 entries each 
instead of 20, I am sure the total entries would have reached the 1800 mark. 

Starting as a very wet, cold, backward spring with an excess of rainfall of 
better than twelve inches above normal, the season continued cool and moist, 
providing poor growing and ripening conditions for warm weather crops like 
tomatoes. This was noticeable not only in the children's gardens but in com- 
mercial establishments and in the wholesale market until early September. 
Tomatoes are the number one crop in the children's gardens as indicated by 
the fact that there were 89 and 91 entries respectively in the two green tomato 
classes. 

The large school garden on the Cummings Estate in Woburn, operated by 
the Boston School Department in cooperation with the Park Department, as 
usual, had an outstanding display covering nearly 150 square feet. This display 
was of such fine quality and so well done that the judges not only awarded it 
first prize but also the Society's Gold Medal and a special award donated by the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture. This is the second successive year 
that this garden has received these outstanding special awards, and it is the 
only school garden ever to receive the coveted Gold Medal of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society. 

18 



REPORT OF LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

The 4-H Club Exhibit in the upper hall, under the able direction of Earl 
H. Nodine, Assistant State Club Leader, required more tables than usual. 
Here again there was an increase in the number of entries of vegetables and 
flowers. High quality gave the judges a real problem in many classes as was the 
case in the Home and School Garden Section. 

As a member of the Committee presenting this report on the Children's 
Garden Exhibit, I wish to thank the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for 
its genuine interest and assistance to the School and Home Garden movement. 

Henry G. Wendler 
for the Committee on Children's Gardens 

Report of Library Committee 

It is a great pleasure to report on the proposed Library improvements 
which will be undertaken this year. The ceiling will be painted for the 
first time in at least thirty years. Fluorescent lights on the ceilings and in 
the alcoves will be installed this summer. A Ladies' Advisory Committee 
consisting of Mrs. William A. Parker, Mrs. Roger S. Warner and Mrs. Irving 
C. Wright was appointed to survey the Library for the purpose of determining 
what improvements could be made in the general appearance of the Library. 
Their recommendations were as follows: 

1. 12 lighted show cases to be designed and built to replace the three 
present display cases. 

2. Comfortable chairs for reading to be purchased for two alcoves. 

3. Fresh cut flowers to be supplied the Library every week. This is now 
being carried out. 

The Trustees have authorized these improvements and they will be carried 
out as money is available. 

An innovation is being tried for the purpose of promoting good public 
relations and making known the advantages of belonging to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society or subscribing to Horticulture. A collection of some 
fifty-nine of the best garden and flower books has been made. This together 
with some prints and some past issues of Horticulture was sent to the Ipswich 
Library as a loan collection for two weeks. A Sunday afternoon meeting, 
arranged by the Friends of the Library and the local garden clubs, was held. 
Both Mr. Foley and Miss Manks spoke about the Society and the Library. 

During the past year, 6,280 books were loaned, an increase of 280. 

Additions included 1,161 books of which 660 were from the bequest of 
Albert C. Burrage, while 501 were additions of current books and bound 
magazines. 

Coffee was served in the Trustee's Room at the time of the exhibition of 
Flowers in Art and a collection of prints and books was displayed by the 
Library which was very well attended. 

Another bookcase was set up in the Trustee's Room to house the collection 
of rare old books left to the Society by Albert C. Burrage. 

Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 
Committee on the Library 

19 




Report of the Committee on Prizes 

nce again, I have been requested to submit to you a report of the 
various activities of the Committee on Prizes. Now, I would much 
rather speak to you on some other subject, such as, for instance, the 
growing of plants in tin cans. Here at least is something with which I am really 
familiar and which you might find more interesting and instructive. 

I am quite sure that many of you know as much, or even more, about judging 
a flower show than I do. It has even been suggested that the public be allowed 
to judge our shows, which, of course, they do, judging not only the show, but 
the judges as well. 

There is, however, another aspect to this whole subject. This Society, which 
sponsors these shows, also makes available certain awards and, so, must have a 
method of procedure. This is accomplished through a Committee on Prizes, 
appointed by the President, and usually made up of the following: a landscape 
architect, an expert on plant material and culture, an estate owner, a private 
gardener and someone well versed in horticulture and show procedure. We 
also have a rule book for exhibitors and judges, which is, without doubt, the best 
thing of its kind available. It is widely used by other groups and societies as well. 

The powers of the Committee on Prizes are as follows, and here I quote from 
the Rule Book: "This Committee appoints the judges and has general super- 
vision over them. It also awards at each exhibition, such special prizes as may 
be recommended by the judges, provided, however, that these recommendations 
are approved by this Committee. It also makes all medal awards at the ex- 
hibitions, whether as sweepstakes or otherwise." 

Now, it has been customary for the Chairman of the Committee to instruct 
judges to make recommendations in regard to awarding the various medals 
of this Society. Yet, according to the Rule Book, this is entirely a prerogative 
of the Committee on Prizes. This Society uses the point system of judging and, 
where intelligently applied, it has worked out very well. 

However, no system of judging is perfect, nor indeed can be. It has been 
objected that no provision has been made for beauty, atmosphere or charm. 
If you decide to bake a cake, you use a recipe and put together certain in- 
gredients, and expect to get a cake, not an apple pie or a beef stew. How good 
the cake will be depends entirely upon the skill, time and effort you put into it. 

So it is with the exhibitor. If his design is good, the plant material suitable 
and of good quality and all is tastefully and harmoniously arranged, he should 
have a thing of beauty, with both atmosphere and charm. It is inconceivable 
to me, that an exhibit should score high and yet not have these qualities in 
some degree. 

This Committee took an active part in the 125th Anniversary Celebration. 
The following awards, made available by the 125th Anniversary Committee, 
were given to the following for having staged "the most meritorious exhibit" 
in a particular show: The Connecticut Valley Horticultural Society, Western 
Massachusetts Flower Show, March 4, 1954; Hixon's Greenhouses, Worcester 
County Horticultural Society Spring Show, March 11, 1954; Mrs. William 
H. Moore, North Shore Horticultural Society Flower Show, August 20, 1954 
and Mr. Alexander I. Heimlich, Topsfield Fair Flower Show, September 5, 1954. 

20 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PRIZES 

An award was also presented to the Horticulture Departments of the School 
of Agriculture and Horticulture of the University of Massachusetts, for the 
outstanding quality of the entire Autumn Exhibition, November 5, 1954. All 
of these awards were very well received and these organizations were greatly 
pleased to know that our Society had recognized their outstanding work. 

This Society maintains a list of judges and a card index of judges which 
had not been revised for many years and had become practically obsolete. 
Your Committee spent considerable time revising this list and will continue 
this work until the files are brought completely up to date. If you are interested 
in judging and feel that you have the necessary qualifications, we would like 
to add your name to our list. Kindly send your request to the Secretary here at 
Horticultural Hall, and I am sure it will receive careful consideration. 

In closing, may I pay tribute to the men who have served so faithfully with 
me on this Committee. For them no sacrifice has been too great. 

Ernest Borowski, Chairman 
Committee on Prizes 




Display of vegetables by the Boston School Garden, Woburn. 
Awarded a Gold Medal 



21 




Garden of Mr. & Mrs. J. Wells Farley, Needham 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



22 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following certificates and medals on the recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Gardens, Oliver Wolcott, chairman. 

The Society's Garden Certificate: 

Mr. James F. Fausnaught, Worcester. A unique moss garden, created by his 
late wife and him, with flagged walks, laurel, and yew, under a grove of witch 
hazel and ash; where all is coolness and verdure. 

The Society's Bronze Medal: 

Miss Mary Norton Allen, Worcester. A beautiful terrace and expansive lawn, 
espaliered trees, schizophragma flourishing on the brick house and many 
other rare shrubs and trees well grown and well displayed. 

Mr. & Mrs. Rockwood Bullock, Worcester. A city garden well screened by 
plantings of Japanese maple, rhododendron, hemlock and yew. There is a 
superb oak, small perennial and vegetable gardens, and a marble-paved ter- 
race of ferns with a pool, offering much beauty and enjoyment in small compass. 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles S. Jenney, Brookline. On the north side of the house an 
interesting shade garden of rhododendron and ivy about a slate-edged pool, on 
the south a sweep of beautifully kept lawn at two levels to a distant planting of 
peonies. 

The Society's Silver Medal: 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Wells Farley, Needham. The house, built on several levels 
against a ledge, is enclosed from the street by trees, iron-work gates, and spring 
flowers. Behind; a terrace and small garden and a curving meadow framed on 
one side by the ledge well planted with evergreens with flowering crabs beyond, 
and on the other by lowland and woods edged by magnolia and azalea. 

Mr. Albert W. Hunt, Millis. Mr. Hunt has used his retirement to embower 
his cottage above the Charles River in serenity and charm. Many of the plant- 
ings were propagated and all are tended by him. There is broom and heather 
where the knoll is left open to the view, a box garden, fine dogwood among 
equally fine oaks and redcedars, and everywhere flowers. 

Filene's, Chestnut Hill Shopping Center. Tall pines against the white-washed 
walls, stone terracing supporting low evergreens, laburnums, lawns and a semi- 
circle of flowers contribute to an industrial planting of rare beauty. 

R. H. Stearns Co., Chestnut Hill Shopping Center. A fine open planting of 
birch and crab apples backed by an excellent combination of shrubs makes a 
happy transition between the Center and its bordering woods. 

The Societfs Gold Medal: 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Stoddard, Worcester. A garden descending in terraces, 
sloping lawns, and bloom to a great white pine at the foot of the slope, its borders 
blending with the woodland. Alpines on the walls and ledges, the stone steps, 
a walk of maiden hair fern and wild ginger, azalea, hemlock and a funkia 
border are among the excellent details in a unified whole. 

23 



The H. H. Hunnewell Medal: 

Dr. & Mrs. George C. Shattuck, Brookline. A place that in its 150 years 
has been the seat of one of the first horticultural schools in America and the 
site of some of the most important early breeding of camellias. It includes 
a pergola of hornbeam, hedges, a vista of lawns and flowers along the high 
brick wall that once backed a line of hot houses, a balustrade set with tiles 
from the China Trade, venerable Redbuds, and laurel and dogwood among 
huge pines and beeches. It has been planted with taste and tended with care 
by five generations of one family. 

Albert c. burrage Gold vase 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase was awarded to the Special Committee 
on the 125th Anniversary of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, for its 
exceptionally well executed program of commemorative events which culmi- 
nated with the Loan Exhibition of "Flowers in Art and Decoration" staged 
October 24 to November 3. Mr. Seth L. Kelsey served as chairman. His able 
committee was composed of Mrs. John S. Ames, Mrs. John H. Cunningham, 
Mrs. William A. Parker, Mrs. Roger S. Warner, Mr. Ernest Borowski, Mr. 
Aubrey B. Butler, Mr. Harold S. Ross, Mr. George Taloumis, Dr. Donald 
Wyman and Mrs. Irving C. Wright. To Mrs. Wright for her ingenious concep- 
tion and execution of the exhibition which brought high praise from the 
public and leading connoisseurs and critics as well, the committee extends 
special tribute. 

— Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 




Garden of Mr. & Mrs. Rockwood Bullock, Worcester 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 

24 







R. H. Stearns Co., Chestnut Hill Shopping Center 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




Filene's. Chestnut Hill Shopping Center 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



25 




A unique lath house, focal point of exhibit of the Women's Exhibitions Com- 
mittee of the Society, designed by Mrs. Irving C. Wright 



26 




Seaside garden staged by H. V. Lawrence, Cape Cod Nurseries 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




Scene of Grand Hall in the Spring Show 



Portraits of New England Horticulturists * 

r 



j/"|f njo a large extent, the history of horticulture in New England is written 
in the portraits which line the Presidents' Gallery at Horticultural Hall, 
and which I trust all of you will see, for it is in the achievements of men 
that history is made. If I name some of these men and a few others, it is because 
in that way I shall have a logical preamble to the introduction of certain persons 
present who are making horticultural history today. 

! Marshall P. Wilder, a horticultural pioneer, was President of both the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society and the American Pomological Society 
and founder of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, now the University of 
Massachusetts. At his home in Dorchester he grew 2,500 pear trees, representing 
800 varieties. Where could that many be found today? He had a camellia 
collection of 300 varieties and sold one that bore his name for one thousand 
dollars, a lot of money in those days. Mounted on a great white horse and 
wearing a tall hat, he made a handsome figure at the state fair, as may be seen 
in a painting on our walls at Horticultural Hall. 

In 1822, Joseph Breck founded the seed business which has continued to 
bear the Breck label to the present day. He was a writer and editor and had 
the largest collection of phlox in the country at his home in Brighton. 

Charles M. Hovey originated the Hovey strawberry in 1836 and with it began 
commercial strawberry growing in the United States. His Fruits of America, 
with 100 color plates, caused a sensation but almost ruined him. 

O. B. Had wen was so well thought of that he became President of both the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society and the Worcester Horticultural Society 
at the same time. 

Francis Parkman, the historian, whose eyes were so weak that he could write 
for only twenty minutes at a time, gave America the Japanese lily which the 
newspapers of the day called the most extraordinary flower which had ever 
been seen in this country. 

President William C. Endicott, the great hybridizer, made history with a 
pear orchard that had come down from colonial days. Incidentally, pears 
seemed to have been held in greater esteem than apples when the colony was 
young. Apples, however, were highly prized in liquid form. One New England 
town near Boston, which had only 200 families, is said to have fortified itself 
each year with nearly ten thousand barrels of cider. 

Albert C. Burrage scoured the world for orchids and in return staged the 
finest orchid exhibits the world has ever seen. This in addition to many other 
notable achievements. 

Ephraim Bull, the gold beater, was not a President, but he gave the world 
the Concord grape and so immortalized himself, although he profited but little 
from his work and had only a gold medal to console his old age. 

Johnny Appleseed was born in Leominster but went West to scatter apple 
seeds and good will. 

Luther Burbank was born in Lancaster and worked a while for the Ames Plow 
Company, then he went to California to become perhaps the most controversial 
figure in the field of horticulture. However, he rates more than three columns 
in the encyclopedias. 

28 



PORTRAITS OF NEW ENGLAND HORTICULTURISTS 

James H. Gregory, a schoolmaster in Marblehead, developed the Hubbard 
squash and sent it to all corners of the country. It made him a seedsman and 
earned him enough money to become a philanthropist — proper goal for all 
seedsmen. 

Charles S. Sargent is responsible for developing the Arnold Arboretum, 
aided as he was by that tireless plant collector E. H. Wilson, who brought to 
New England many of the finest plants we grow today. 

Charles Eliot and the Olmsteds set a landscape pattern for the entire country, 
as one needs only to travel to learn. 

Robert Manning had collected in Salem more varieties of fruits than could 
be found anywhere else in the world at the time of his death in 1842. His son, 
Robert Jr., was my predecessor seventy-five years ago, but it is interesting to 
know that I have had only three predecessors as Secretary of the Horticultural 
Society in a hundred years. Perhaps the job is more of a sinecure. 

I have mentioned only a few of the great horticulturists of the past. I could 

eo on for hours, but the time has come to present the successors of these men 

and women as we find them in New England today. 

* From the remarks of ArnoH. Nehrling at the "Meet New England" luncheon of 
the Ninth Annual American Horticultural Congress. 




Flower study in oils by Thomas Fransioli, displayed in Contemporary Room 

in art exhibit 

29 




French 18th century "overdoor" pineapple carving 

Flowers in Art and Decoration 



j/"|fNjHE most original and bewitching exhibition of decorative arts which 
Bostonians have known for a generation" was the enthusiastic comment 
•H- of Ellery Sedgwick, long time editor of the Atlantic Monthly, in comment- 
ing on the Loan Exhibition of Flowers in Art and Decoration, staged by the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society, October 24-November 3, in commemora- 
tion of its 125th Anniversary. 

Mr. Sedgwick's opinion reflected the response of more than 12,000 visitors 
who attended the Exhibition, which was staged with consummate skill and 
impeccable taste. Outstanding also was the feeling of warmth which it reflected, 
due largely to the personal touch evident throughout. The fact most of the fur- 
nishings came from homes where they have been treasured for generations added 
to the lustre and quality of this memorable anniversary event. 

Flowers, fruit and foliage carved on chairs, desks and tables, delicate inlay 
work, embroidery, needlepoint, tapestries, richly colored Oriental rugs — all 
with decorative motifs of flowers of every conceivable kind and form — were 
arranged in separate alcoves with harmony and skill. 




Decorative panel carved of Swiss pear wood, mounted on a mahogany 
background, made by Mary Abbott 

30 



FLOWERS IN ART AND DECORATION 

Pictures, including oils, watercolors, pastels, engravings and pencil work, 
wood carving, tole ware, decoupage, wall papers, brocades, porcelain, china, 
glass — all were selected and arranged to spell out the influence of flowers 
in the decorative arts. The treasures represented five centuries of creative ex- 
pression of artists (some illustrious, others unknown) from all parts of the world. 

Undoubtedly the most distinctive feature of this Exhibition was the staging 
and the manner in which the several hundred art objects were gathered. Mrs. 
Irving C. Wright, the masterful designer of this gala "birthday party", inte- 
grated the various sections into a harmonious whole. The furnishings which 
were loaned by members and friends of the Society and several museums were 




Section of large Italian tapestry entitled "The Vintage" 

31 



FLOWERS IN ART AND DECORATION 

assembled by the Society's Anniversary Committee headed by Seth L. Kelsey. 
The members included: Mrs. John S. Ames, Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Mrs. 
William A. Parker, Mrs. Roger S. Warner, Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Mr. Ernest 
Borowski, Mr. Aubrey B. Butler, Mr. Harold Ross, Mr. George Taloumis and 
Dr. Donald Wyman. 

Further assistance was provided by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Mrs. Arthur 
Adams, Mrs. John G. Coolidge, Mrs. Francis Crowninshield, Mrs. Greely S. 
Curtis, Charles M. Fleischner, Mrs. S. Eliot Guild, Mrs. Henry Lyman, Mrs. 
Augustin H. Parker, Mrs. James H. Perkins, Mrs. Constantin Partzoff, Mrs. 
Louis E. Phaneuf, Mrs. Henry H. Richards, Mrs. Richard H. Russell, Mrs. 
Frank Sawtelle, Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Mrs. Stephen Wheatland, Miss 
Eleanor Raymond, Mrs. Anson H. Smith and Mrs. Robert M. P. Kennard. 

One of the most dramatic attractions of the Exhibition was the effective way 
in which the high vaulted ceiling of the large Exhibition Hall was camouflaged 
with a voluminous canopy of shimmering white nylon, draped like two sections 
of a Persian tent. Suspended from above were two immense "floral fantasies", 
composed of a variety of flowers fashioned by hand from copper foil. These lent 
gaiety and a festive air to the entire show, particularly with the circular re- 
flecting pools beneath, which were accented with superbly wrought ivy trellises 
of an intriguing spiral design. 

An entire wall draped with richly colored and patterned fabrics from the 
Scalamandre Museum of Textiles of New York showed the dominant influence 
of many kinds of plant forms. On the opposite wall, panels of old French wall 
papers and reproductions of these elegant floral patterns were assembled from 
the collection of Nancy McClelland, widely known decorator. Several alcoves 




Contemporary room featured Lurcat tapestry 

32 



FLOWERS IN ART AND DECORATION 

contained flower prints, including rare colored engravings by Van Huysum, 
a series of four flower studies by Andrey Avinoff, a superb pastel by Laura 
Hills and a sizeable collection of notable flower and fruit studies. 

In addition to the two large halls filled with traditional pieces, one entire 
room, designed by Miss Eleanor Raymond, was devoted to contemporary art. 
Among the painters represented were Chagall, Georgia O'Keefe, Toni Fran- 
cioli, Charles Hopkinson, dean of Boston painters, Walter Stein, Florine Stett- 
heimer and many others whose work is widely known. 

A Matisse rug and an unusual pair of Lurcat tapestries, together with choice 
pieces of modern glass, a wide array of textiles, ceramics and a striking dried 
arrangement were staged in a charming gallery. The strong functional feeling 
of modern architecture which was apparent in the loggia and terrace adjoining 
the picture gallery was a distinct contrast to the alcoves of period furnishings 
and decor. Yet the influence of plants was apparent in the decorative motif 
throughout. 




An alcove showing a Dutch cabinet, Venetian chair, Howard Cushing's 
painting, "Children in Orchard" and Monet's, "The Artist's Young Wife 

and Child" 



33 




Estate of Dr. and Mrs. George C. Shattuck, Brookline 
Awarded H. H. Hunnewell Medal 



The Gardens and Greenhouses of 

Col. Thomas Handasyd Perkins 

in Brookline, Massachusetts * 

Having made a fortune in the China trade as junior partner of J. & T. H. 
Perkins & Co., Colonel Perkins in the year 1779 bought a large tract 
of land on Sweetbriar Lane, now Warren Street, in Brookline, Massa- 
chusetts. Soon thereafter the Colonel, at 36 years of age, began to lay out 
gardens, to plant ornamental trees and shrubs and to build very extensive 
greenhouses. 

According to contemporary horticulturists (1830-1839), it appears that 
Col. Perkins' greenhouses were unrivalled in the vicinity of Boston until after 
the return from China in 1827 of the Colonel's nephew, John P. Cushing, who 
had represented J. & T. H. Perkins & Co. for 24 years in Canton. Cushing 
never married and his estate in Watertown was broken up soon after his death. 
Col. Perkins died in 1854 at 90 years of age. Part of his property in Brookline, 
including the gardens and greenhouses, has remained in the hands of direct 
descendents as follows: 



* The Massachusetts Horticultural Society in 1927 awarded its Medal to Mrs. 
Frederick C. Shattuck for "A Garden of Unusual Character", and, in 1954, the 
Society awarded the Hunnewell Medal to George C. Shattuck. 

34 



THE GARDENS AND GREENHOUSES OF COL. THOMAS HANDASYD PERKINS 

Mrs. Samuel Cabot (Eliza Perkins) 1855-1885 

Mrs. Henry Lee (Elizabeth Cabot) 1885-1909 

Mrs. Frederick C. Shattuck (Elizabeth Lee) 1910-1931 

Dr. George C. & Mr. Henry L. Shattuck 1931- 

A brief account of Col. Perkins' camellias was published in the "American 
Camellia Yearbook for 1953" (p. 44) but much additional information is 
available about the gardens and greenhouses. Not only did Col. Perkins' 
head gardener, Mr. W. H. Cowan, propagate hundreds of camellias from seed 
but some new varieties were produced. One of these was named Coward. 

No very early description of Col. Perkins' estate has been seen but, in 1832, 
Mr. Dearborn, President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society said: 1 

"Col. Perkins has made great successful efforts to advance the culture of 
choice fruits, as well as to encourage a taste for ornamental gardening, as is 
well known by those who have visited his beautiful grounds. From his extended 
commercial intercourse with all parts of the world, he has been enabled to 
collect numerous rare and valuable trees, and plants; and with that liberality, 
for which he is distinguished, he has freely distributed them throughout the 
country. Such munificent patrons of useful and ornamental planting, not only 
accelerate the progress of horticulture, in their immediate vicinity, but the 
influence of their practical operations is extended over the Republic, and will 
be gratefully remembered by their fellow citizens." 

The American Gardener's Magazine, & c in 1836 (Vol. II, p. 64) described 
some interesting plants in the greenhouses as follows: 

"The fine plant of Enkianthus quinqueflora, in this collection only, is now in 
full bloom, and a more charmingly beautiful display we have never been 
gratified with: the end of every shoot, twelve in number, is terminated with an 
umbel of its pendulous, bell-shaped, wax-like flowers. We were surprised to 
notice, in Loudon's Magazine for October, that it had never flowered but 
once in the vicinity of London: even the Messrs. Loddiges, from whose un- 
rivalled collection this plant was purchased, have not yet been successful in 
blooming it. Strelitzia augusta does not yet show buds. The new flowered sage, 
Salvia involucrata, was in bloom, as also fulgens and splendens; Antholyza aethiopica 
was displaying a spike of its pretty orange and red blossoms. Sparmannia africana, 
and Acacia longifolia, were beginning to open their buds. We noticed that Mr. 
Cowan raises his ericas in the centre of the pots, as recommended by that 
excellent cultivator, Mr. McNab, in his treatise on Cape heaths. Notwith- 
standing the opinion of some intelligent gardeners, that heaths cannot be 
grown with success in our climate, we never saw any look more flourishingly. 

"Under the stage, Mr. Cowan has cut fine mushrooms all the winter: he had 
a bed built up, which he sowed with spawn, early in the fall: the crop has 
been very large, and he continues to cut several every week." 

Mr. Cowan's method of training the peach trees 2 under glass was especially 
interesting: 

"The trees are trained on the back wall, on a wire trellis under the glass, 
and on a trellis raised half way between the ground and the glass. Those under 
the glass were trained as if the shoots of the peach were as pliable as the vine. 

35 




Garden path on the estate of Dr. and Mrs. George C. Shattuck, Brookline 



36 



THE GARDENS AND GREENHOUSES OF COL. THOMAS HANDASYD PERKINS 

One stem was brought up perpendicularly to the top of the front wall; it here 
divided off into two shoots and each ran along horizontally, being made 
stationary by fastening with shreds; from these horizontal shoots two or three 
branches were carried up the trellis under each rafter of the house, leaving a 
distance of about two feet between the branches under the centre of each 
light, that the sun may have considerable influence on those trained below." 

The Annual Reports of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society repeatedly 
describe exhibits from Col. Perkins' greenhouses. In 1830, there were grapes, 
the St. Peters, Muscat of Alexandria, white Frontignac, black Frontignac, 
black Hamburg, flame colored Tokay, Chasselas or Sweet Water, and also 
peaches, nectarines and branches of Irish Ivy raised from cuttings which 
had been obtained at Carrisbrook and Warwick Castles in England. 

Subsequent exhibits contained additional varieties of grapes, a new kind of 
squash and the flowers of Phaseolus caracalla, "a rare greenhouse plant of singular 
appearance and delightful fragrance" (1835). 

Besides various kinds of grapes, the exhibits in 1837 (Mass. Hort. Soc. Rep't, 
p. 36) included "Peaches — the Noblesse, New Royal George, Freestone 
Heath, Hill's Madeira, President, George IV; Nectarines — Elrouge, Red 
Roman and Broomfield, all finest specimens of most skillful cultivation; also, a 
variety of the Permain, newly introduced, a handsome red fruit; varieties of 
Musk Mellon." In addition (p. 43), there was "a splendid display of cut 
Flowers, arranged on stands with great taste." 

In the Memorial History of Boston (edited by Winsor, Vol. 4, p. 625) Mar- 
shall P. Wilder said "In 1840 he (Perkins) introduced the Victoria Hamburg, 
West's St. Peter's and Cannon Hall Muscat grape-vines which were presented 
to him by Sir Joseph Paxton, gardener to the Duke of Devonshire." 

In the eighteen thirties the old method of heating greenhouses by means 
of smoke flues was being superseded by the use of steam or hot water circulating 
through metal pipes. 

Probably Col. Perkins was the first person in the vicinity of Boston to install 
hot water pipes for heating some of his greenhouses. 3 He was very pleased with 
the results obtained with large, cast iron piping used according to the plan of 
Mr. Atkinson of London. A second kind of installation devised by Mr. A. M. 
Perkins 4 proved less satisfactory. 

The last of the grapehouses of Col. Perkins was pulled down about 1933. 
The vines in it were black Hamburgs and Muscats. This house was heated by 
means of the original smoke flue built of brick. The roof was low and gently 
sloping. During the growing season, the vines were tied up under the roof and 
in winter, they were detached and wrapped in straw. 

Two sections of the greenhouses which were built in 1831 survived until after 
World War II. They were heated by water circulating through very large 
cast iron pipes. Probably, these pipes were installed by Col. Perkins. An oil 
burner and electric circulator have been put into the one remaining house 
but many of the old pipes were not disturbed and they are still in use. 

Somewhere on the grounds, the Colonel had a billiard house and tradition 
says that there was also a pheasant run. 

At the foot of the garden stands a brick building still in good repair. In 

37 



THE GARDENS AND GREENHOUSES OF COL. THOMAS HANDASYD PERKINS 

Col. Perkins' time this building housed apprentice gardeners and was called 
"The College". 

Another interesting feature of the garden is a low wall topped by perforated 
Chinese tiles of a greenish blue color. Doubtless, these tiles came from Canton 
in one of the Perkins' vessels. 

The pleached allee, which is unique in this vicinity, was put in by the Lees, 
probably about the year 1890. 

Some of the huge beech trees which measure more than 17 feet in diameter, 
and some old Norway spruces, hemlocks, white pines and black oaks must have 
flourished in Col. Perkins' day. 

In the garden there are two venerable red-bud trees. Their trunks are split 
and rotting and they have lost some large branches. Nevertheless, they bloom 
profusely every year. At about one foot above the level of the ground, the 
diameter of the trunks measures, respectively, 7 feet 2 inches and 7 feet 4 inches. 
How old are they and where can one see red-buds as large? 

George C. Shattugk, M.D. 



1 New England Farmer and Horticultural Journal, 1832, Vol. X, New Series 
Vol. I, p. 156. 

2 American Gardener's Magazine, 1835, Vol. 1, p. 74. 

3 See extract of letter from Col. Perkins to the Pres. of the Mass. Hort. Soc., Mr. 
Dearborn, New Eng. Farmer & Hort. Jour., 1832, p. 156 and letter to Mr. Fessen- 
den, Ibid., 1833, p. 262. 

4 Ibid. 




Box hedge in garden of Dr. and Mrs. George C. Shattuck, Brookline 

38 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 

The George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Presentation of the George Robert White Medal of Honor to Dr. Richard 
P. White, Executive Secretary of the American Association of Nurserymen was 
one of the Association's highlights at its 1955 convention held in Toronto, 
Canada, July 10-14. Seth L. Kelsey, a member of the Board of Trustees, made 
the presentation in behalf of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Con- 
sidered the top horticultural award in America, this medal is given annually 
to the person "who has done the most in recent years to advance horticulture 
in its broadest sense". 

Dr. White was cited for his outstanding service to the nursery industry and 
the plant buying public. Under his skilled and far-sighted stewardship, the 
American Association of Nurserymen has increased more than fivefold. Today, 
more than sixteen hundred members are united for the effective promotion of 
higher horticultural standards. In addition, Dr. White has actively advanced 
the Association's "Plant America" program, through which industrial and 
institutional landscaping has been recognized as a vital factor for the better- 
ment of our community and national life. 

The George Robert White Medal, which was made possible by a gift to the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society, was first awarded in 1909 to Prof. Charles 
Sprague Sargent, Director of the Arnold Arboretum. During the past 45 
years, many noted plantsmen, botanists, and landscape architects have been 
included in the list of recipients. Among them were: Ernest H. Wilson, John 
McLaren, Dr. Liberty Hyde Bailey, David Fairchild, J. Horace McFarland, 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Frederick L. Olmsted, Robert Moses, Richardson Wright 
and Sir William Wright Smith. 

Dr. White, a native of Massachusetts, did his undergraduate work at Dart- 
mouth and received a degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Cornell University 
in 1926. He has served on the faculties of Kansas State College and Rutgers 
University, and for five years, as secretary of the National Shade Tree 
Conference. 

For the past 1 8 years, Dr. White has been Executive Secretary of the Ameri- 
can Association of Nurserymen, Washington, D. C. Author of numerous 
research publications, he has been prominently identified with the National 
Capital Flower and Garden Show. 



Jackson Dawson Medal 

The Jackson Dawson Medal was awarded to Paul Vossberg, noted horticul- 
turist and propagator of the Westbury Rose Company, Westbury, Long Island, 
New York. Mr. Vossberg has made notable advances in the propagation of 
azaleas, rhododendrons and other choice woody plants. 



39 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 

Thomas Roland medal 

The Thomas Roland Medal given for exceptional skill in horticulture was 
awarded to Peter Arnott of Chestnut Hill, Mass. Mr. Arnott, superintendent 
of the estate of Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, has left an indelible imprint on New 
England horticulture during his 45 years of service with the Websters. 

GOLD MEDAL OF THE SOCIETY 

The Large Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
awarded to Mrs. Irving C. Wright of Chestnut Hill, Mass., for her skill in 
designing the gardens of the Women's Exhibitions Committee at the Society's 
Spring Show as well as her extraordinary success in planning the Society's 
125th Anniversary Exhibition "Flowers in Art and Decoration". (See illustra- 
tion, page 10.) 

SILVER MEDAL OF THE SOCIETY 

The Silver Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was awarded 
to Miss Sarah E. Brassill of Weymouth, Mass., for noteworthy service in 
horticulture. Now in her 92nd year and still active in 4-H Club work, Miss 
Brassill has devoted a large part of her life in teaching gardening techniques 
to children. 




Miss Sarah E. Brassill. Awarded a 
Silver Medal of the Society 



Peter Arnott. Awarded the Thomas 
Roland Medal 



40 






Paul D. Vossberg, Westbury Rose Co., Westbury L. I., N. Y. 
Recipient of the Jackson Dawson Meda] 

41 



McQuaid 




Garden of Mr. James F. Fausnaught, Worcester 
Awarded a Garden Certificate of the Society 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Jenney, Brookline 
Awarded a Bronze Medal of the Society 

42 




Garden of Mary Norton Allen, Worcester 
Awarded a Bronze Medal of the Society 




Garden of Albert W. Hunt, Millis 
Awarded a Silver Medal of the Society 

43 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1954 
The Albert C. Burrage Gold vase 

The 125th Anniversary Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 
for the most outstanding exhibit in 1954. 

GEORGE ROBERT WHITE MEDAL OF HONOR 

Dr. Richard P. White, Washington, D. C, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland medal 

Peter Arnott, Chestnut Hill, for exceptional skill in growing and exhibiting 
plants over a long period of years. 

JACKSON DAWSON MEDAL 

Paul Vossberg, Westbury, L. I., N. Y., for outstanding work in developing 
processes of propagation for azaleas and rhododendrons. 

H. H. HUNNEWELL MEDAL 

Dr. and Mrs. George C. Shattuck, Brookline, for an estate showing rare skill and 
beauty. 

Gold Medals of the 
massachusetts horticultural society 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stoddard, Worcester, for a garden of unusual charm and 

beauty. 
Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Chestnut Hill, for developing and executing plans for 

the Spring Flower Shows. 

SILVER MEDALS OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Miss Sarah E. Brassill, Weymouth, for noteworthy service in horticulture. 
Filene's, Chestnut Hill Shopping Center, for an industrial planting of rare 

beauty. 
Albert W. Hunt, Millis, for a garden expressing serenity and charm. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Wells Farley, Needham, for a garden of unusual charm. 
R. H. Stearns Co., Chestnut Hill Shopping Center, for an industrial planting in 

keeping with the surroundings. 

BRONZE MEDALS OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Miss Mary Norton Allen, Worcester, for a well designed and interesting garden. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rockwood Bullock, Worcester, for an unusual city garden. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Jenney, Brookline, for an interesting shade garden and 
beautifully kept lawn. 

GARDEN CERTIFICATE OF THE 
MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Mr. James F. Fausnaught, Worcester, for a garden of unusual charm. 

44 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1954 

THE PRESIDENT'S CUP 

Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for a rock garden at the Spring Show. 

GOLD MEDAL OF THE 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OF NEW YORK 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, North Easton, for an azalea garden at the Spring 
Show. 

GOLD MEDAL CERTIFICATE OF THE 
PENNSYLVANIA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for a group of acacias at the Spring 
Show. 

GEORGE HOLLIDAY MEMORIAL PRIZE 

Malcolm Macrae, North Easton, for an exhibit of azaleas at the Spring Show. 

BEACON HILL GARDEN CLUB CUP 

Charles River Valley Garden Club, for the most charming garden club exhibit 
in the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John s. Ames cup 

Noanett Garden Club, for the exhibit displaying the greatest horticultural ex- 
cellence in the garden club section in the Spring Show. 

THE ANTOINE LEUTHY PRIZE 

The North Shore Horticultural Society, for a tropical garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Trophy of the 
massachusetts department of agriculture 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., Northampton, for rose exhibits at the Spring Show. 

The Bulkley medal of the 
garden club of america 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society, for presenting the 125th Anniversary 
New England Spring Flower Show. 

JOHN TAYLOR ARMS AWARD 

Mrs. Robert Moore, Marblehead, for a flower arrangement at the Spring Show. 

The Beatrix farrand silver bowl 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, North Easton, for the best exhibit of azaleas in the 
Spring Show. 

AMERICAN ORCHID SOCIETY SILVER MEDAL 

Twin Brook Greenhouses, Topsfield, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

45 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1954 

BOOK: "HOLLIES" 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby, Manchester, for camellia Lotus, best bloom in the Show. 

Crystal vases 

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston, for tulip Northern Queen, best bloom 

in the Show. 
Breck's, Boston, for daffodil Yellow Sun, best bloom in the Show. 

125TH Anniversary Awards 

Hixon's Greenhouses, Worcester, for a spring garden. 

Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for a rock garden. 

Mrs. William H. Moore, Prides Crossing, for the most beautiful exhibit. 

Connecticut Valley Horticultural Society, for the Queen's Garden. 

Horticultural Departments of the School of Agriculture and Horticulture at the 

University of Massachusetts, for their Fall Flower Show. 
Women's Exhibitions Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 

for Garden Patterns of Two Centuries at the Spring Show. 

HORTICULTURE MAGAZINE'S 

50TH ANNIVERSARY AWARD 

Harold D. Stevenson, Rockland, for his overall plan of Grand Hall and his 
seascape depicting the Boston waterfront of 1829. 

Gold Medals 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, for an azalea garden at the Spring Show. 

Arnold Arboretum, for an exhibit of Japanese dwarfed trees at the Spring Show. 

Associated Fruit Growers of Massachusetts, for an educational display of apples. 

Bala-Cynwyd Garden Club (at Philadelphia), for the most outstanding garden 
in the Philadelphia Spring Show. 

Bartlett Gardens, for an herb garden at the Spring Show. 

Birchville Gardens, Plainville, Conn., for the most meritorious exhibit in the 
Gladiolus Show. 

Boston Market Gardeners, for an educational display of vegetables. 

Boston Park Department, for reproducing the seal of the Massachusetts Hor- 
ticultural Society at the Spring Show. 

Boston School Garden, Woburn, for a display of vegetables. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 

Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 

Breck's, for an old-fashioned garden at the Spring Show. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for an exhibit of cacti and succulents at the Spring Show. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a display of peonies. 

Commission of Natural Resources, for a scene within a typical state park at the 
Spring Show. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dane, for a group of Odontoglossums at the Spring Show. 

Fishelson, the Florist, for a flower market at the Spring Show. 

46 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1954 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. George E. Taylor, Chairman), 

for flower arrangements based on the theme "Our New England Heritage" 

at the Spring Show. 
Alexander I. Heimlich, for a rock garden at the Spring Show. 
Kelsey-Highlands Nursery, for a formal exhibit commemorating the 125th 

Anniversary of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee (Mrs. 

Stephen Wheatland, Chairman), for a group of gardens based on theme 

"Garden Patterns of Two Centuries" at the Spring Show. 
National Association of Gardeners (Cape Cod Branch), for an informal June 

garden at the Spring Show. 
New York Agricultural Experiment Station, for a display of seedling grapes 

and apples. 
Norumbega Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Parker Bros., for combined apple displays. 

Mrs. A. P. Saunders, Clinton, New York, for a collection of cut peony blooms. 
Harold D. Stevenson, for depicting the Boston waterfront of 1829 at the Spring 

Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of acacias at the Spring Show. 
Twin Brook Greenhouses, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 
Ruth V. Twombly (at New York) for the best private exhibit in the New York 

Flower Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Weston Nurseries, for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 

SILVER MEDALS 

Arnold Arboretum, for a display of flowering shrubs. 

Ernest Borowski, for a group of azaleas. 

Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of clivias at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown, for a display of camellias. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellia arrangements. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Elliott's Blueberry Nursery, for exhibits of cultivated blueberries. 

Gardeners' & Florists' Club of Boston, for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 

G. Peabody Gardner, for a group of schizanthus and cinerarias at the Spring 

Show. 
G. Peabody Gardner, for a display of camellias. 
Gardner Museum, for a formal planting at the Spring Show. 
The Greenlaws, for a group of begonias at the Spring Show. 
Jamaica Plain High School Agricultural Department, for an informal garden at 

the Spring Show. 
C. H. Lothrop, for a display of double snapdragons at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Orchid Society, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Middlesex County Beekeepers Association, for a beekeeping exhibit at the 

Spring Show. 
New England Rose Society, for an exhibit of old-fashioned roses. 
North Shore Horticultural Society, for a tropical garden at the Spring Show. 

47 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1954 

Old Colony Landscape Service, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

R. C. Paine, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

John Thibodeau, for a display of miniature bulbs at the Spring Show. 

Bronze medals 

Arnold Arboretum, for a display of flowering shrubs. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Danielson, for a formal exhibit of greenhouse plants at 

the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Francis P. Sears, for a group of greenhouse plants at the Spring Show. 

FIRST CLASS CERTIFICATES 

Geranium Gustave Emich, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Awards of Merit 

Azalea Christmas Bells, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Azalea White Christmas, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Begonia Atlas, exhibited by The Merrys. 

Begonia Dark Beauty, exhibited by The Merrys. 

Begonia Emma Watson, exhibited by The Merrys. 

Gladiolus Mary Churchill Glidden, exhibited by Evelyn Glidden. 

Rose Kate Smith, exhibited by Jackson & Perkins, Newark, New York. 

Snapdragon Longfellow, exhibited by C. H. Lothrop at the Spring Show. 

Cultural Certificates 

Arnold Arboretum, for Japanese dwarfed trees at the Spring Show. 
Boston School Garden, Woburn, for a display of vegetables. 
Thomas L. Galvin, for large-flowered dahlias. 
Dr. B. R. Gardiner, for the tree peony Hanakisoi. 
George Hewitt, for a group of clivias at the Spring Show. 
James Hurley, for a specimen orchid plant at the Spring Show. 
Malcolm Macrae, for a pan of daffodils at the Spring Show. 
Thomas Roland, Inc., for a group of cypripediums at the Spring Show. 
John Sullivan, for a formal planting at the Spring Show. 

VOTES OF THANKS 

Mrs. Elizabeth Coffin, for cucumbers. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Coffin, for dried beans. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Coffin, for crown gourds. 

Mrs. F. H. Crocker, for a driftwood planter coffee table at the Spring Show. 

F. T. D., for a display of flower arrangements at the Spring Show. 

Dr. B. R. Gardiner, for a collection of peonies. 

Mrs. George Gottwald, for a vase of pussywillows at the Spring Show. 

The Greenlaws, for a miniature begonia garden at the Spring Show. 

Francis W. Hunnewell, for Camellia Lotus. 

John Merz, for a pineapple plant. 

Arthur Pausch, for rhododendron hybrids. 

George Tyler, for a specimen magnolia. 

48 




49 



The Albert Cameron Burrage Library 

To everyone who loves books, another book lover's library is of interest, 
both for the collection itself and for what it tells about the collector. The 
horticultural library of the late Albert Cameron Burrage is, accordingly, 
revealing of its owner's interests and a rich store of horticultural treasures. 

Mr. Burrage, from boyhood, was interested in horticulture. In 1920 he con- 
tributed to the March Flower Show in Boston an exhibit of orchids unique 
in size, in number of varieties and in beauty of staging. The following year he 
became President of the newly formed American Orchid Society and of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society, which office he held until his death in 
1931. He became interested in the conservation of native wild flowers. To 
dramatize conservation in the public mind, he put on in Horticultural Hall 
an exhibition — a replica of a natural mountain gorge — which has never 
been equalled in beauty, perfection or educational value. At the same time, 
his business skill was being used to expand the work and influence of the 
Society. Consequently, in 1922 the Trustees awarded him the George Robert 
White Medal of Honor (the highest horticultural award in the country) 
naming these three accomplishments in the citation. 

Mr. Burrage's benefactions to horticulture through the Massachusetts Hor- 
ticultural Society were both practical and imaginative. The growth of the 
Society in his administration made necessary a number of alterations in the 
office quarters, and he contributed generously to the expenses involved. He 
gave trust funds (which bear his name) for the promotion of the cranberry 
industry in Massachusetts, for a gold medal for annual award for "a newly 
created porch overlooking a garden", for the purchase of books for the library, 
and for a gold vase to be given each year "for the most outstanding exhibit in 
any of the shows of the Society held during the year". And finally he bequeathed 
to the Society his valuable horticultural library. It has now been fully catalogued. 

The collection is made up of approximately eight hundred volumes, and 
falls into four divisions — orchid literature, plant hunting and travel in 
countries where orchids are found, general horticulture and nature conserva- 
tion, and collectors' rarities. 

Although orchids were described in very early botanical works, they did 
not attract attention until the eighteenth century, when world-wide exploration 
made the tropics known to European and American scientists. The earliest 
work in our collection is Sir John Hill's "Orchids and Plantes Ally'd to Them" 
(1774). The real interest, however, did not develop until the 1840's, and then 
it grew steadily. From the 1860's on we find in the collection such standard 
books as Williams's "Orchid Grower's Manual", Castle's "Orchids, Their 
Structure, History and Culture", Sander's "Orchid Guide" and many less 
well known. Two manuscripts by P. H. Gosse, "A Synopsis of Cultivated 
Orchids" and a notebook of memoranda are noteworthy. Within the last 
few years we have been experimenting with orchids as house plants. The 
Burrage collection takes this back to 1904, with Braecklin's "Die Orchideen 
und Ihre Kultur in Zimmer". 

To botanists, orchids are a challenging family because of unique and complex 
structure and their dependence on certain insects for pollination and on soil 

50 



THE ALBERT CAMERON BURRAGE LIBRARY 

fungi for nourishment. One of the most famous studies is Charles Darwin's 
"Fertilization of Orchids by Insects", and the collection includes translations 
into French and German. Much botanical research is published in technical 
journals, and we have generous representation of the writings of such important 
men as Rudolph Schlechter, Eugene Pfitzer, J. J. Smith, Fritz Kraentzlin and 
Oakes Ames. Some of our members will recall that Professor Ames was a 
Bostonian and a contemporary of Mr. Burrage, a Trustee and Vice-President. 

The unique part of the orchid record, however, is a collection of water color 
drawings of cultivated hybrids, numbering many hundred items, done by the 
best botanical artists. This historical record will be of increasing interest. 

The second major unit of the collection is plant hunting and travel. Al- 
though a few orchids grow naturally in Europe and North America, the showy 
forms are from the topics of both the old and new worlds. Naturally the floras 
of these countries would be in such a library. Mr. Burrage's interest went 
further, and led him to include accounts of the expeditions of scientific explorers 
and plant hunters, and of the ways of native life that they found. In the long 
list are such famous books as Sven Hedin Hedin "Trans-Himalaya, Discoveries 
and Adventures in Tibet", Lady Margaret Brooke, ranee of Sarawak "My 
Life in Sarawak", Henry M. Stanley "In Darkest Africa", Charles Darwin 
"Voyage of the Beagle", F. Kingdon Ward "The Mystery Rivers of Tibet", 
Alfred Russel Wallace, "The Malay Archipelago", and David Fairchild 
"Exploring for Plants". 

Mr. Burrage's interest in horticulture and conservation appears in a good 
working library. Many books of this kind have their day and then are replaced. 
Others are always of interest, at least to the historian of the subject, and with 
these may be included Eastwood's "Complete Manual for the Cultivation of 
the Cranberry" (the first book on this fruit); "The Floral Magazine, 1861-1880" 
(with many beautiful colored plates). Mr. Burrage's interest in the greenhouse 
no doubt led to his adding such works as Tod's "Plans, Elevations and Sections 
of Hot-Houses and . . . Conservatories" (1807), Hibberd's "New and Rare 
Beautiful-leaved Plants" and Turner's "Fruits and Vegetables under Glass". 

The thirty volumes of "collectors' rarities" are herbals and other early 
works. A few of them will suggest the quality of the whole group. There is the 
Philemon Holland translation of Pliny's Natural History, published in London 
in 1601, and still referred to today. There are two copies of Fuchs' "De Historia 
Stirpium Commentarii", the first edition published in Basel in 1542 and a 
German translation of 1549. Both have uncolored plates. In books of this 
period the uncolored state is rarely found, and adds to the value of the copy 
as a collector's item, and to our pleasure in the beauty of the woodcuts. Finally, 
there are three incunabula (books printed before 1500), items which always 
delight a collector, and which in themselves are often beautiful examples 
of printing art. One of these works is a little essay by Thomas Aquinas, "De 
Esse et Essentiis", published in Venice in 1488. The other two are editions 
of Theophrastus' works. One, in a beautiful Greek type, was published in 
1495-1498 by the famous Venetian printer Aldus. The other, printed in 1483, 
is a rare Latin version by Theodore of Gaza, much prized by Latin scholars. 

Dorothy S. Manks, Librarian 

51 



F 



Report of the Treasurer 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1954 

*n\or the second year in succession, the operations of your Society were 
conducted at a loss — this time a very sizeable one as compared with 
the deficit of about $16,000 reported last year. The loss for 1954 amounted 
to $66,951.08. This may seem at first impression a very dismal showing, and I 
hasten to explain that except for two factors which I shall mention later, the 
Society's income and outgo in most departments compared very favorably with 
those of previous years. 

Our income from investments, for example, reached a new high of about 
$66,000 as compared with $56,000 in 1953 which was the previous high. Our 
normal operating expenses were kept well within bounds, and the Spring Show 
of 1954 was successful from every point of view. 

The large deficit for 1954 may be traced mostly to the intensive efforts made 
during the year to enlarge the circulation of our magazine Horticulture. 
How well the efforts have succeeded may be judged by our present circulation 
which is now close to a figure of 75,000 subscribers. It is also encouraging to 
be able to report that Horticulture's operations thus far in 1955 indicate 
that the abnormal expenditures made in 1954 are bearing fruit, and I think 
it is fairly safe to predict that the deficit from Horticulture in 1955 will 
be very greatly reduced although it is too soon to expect that our publication 
will be self-supporting. While immensely proud of what Horticulture has 
been able to achieve as a publication of top quality in its field, the officers of 
your Society and the staff of Horticulture are keenly conscious of the financial 
aspects of the situation and are bending every effort to make Horticulture 
self-supporting. I believe that they will be successful in these efforts although 
it may take time. 

The other contributor to the deficit was the beautiful exhibition of "Flowers 
In Art and Decoration" to commemorate our 125th Anniversary. If ever 
there was an artistic success, this was it, and the fact that it operated at a net 
loss of about $12,000 is nothing that the Society need be ashamed of. You will 
forgive me, I hope, for pointing out again something that I have mentioned in 
many of my previous reports; namely, that we are not a money-making in- 
stitution. I, for one, feel very proud of our Society for its great accomplishment 
in its 125th Anniversary exhibition, and so long as we can preserve our financial 
soundness, I hope the Society will not hesitate about undertakings that will 
enrich the cultural and educational values of the community. 

In the light of the extremely successful financial results of the 1955 Spring 
Show and the improved showing of Horticulture, I feel that we are returning 
once more toward an equilibrium between income and outgo. At least, I feel 
on very firm ground in predicting that if we operate at a loss in 1955, it will 
prove to be a relatively modest one. 

Stedman Buttrick 
Treasurer 



52 



Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AT DECEMBER 31, 1954 

Assets 

Cash In Banks And On Hand $ 46,380.82 

Accounts Receivable — "Horticulture" 10,742.25 

Accounts Receivable $ 1 1,442 . 25 

Deduct: Allowance for losses in collection. . . 700.00 

$ 10,742.25 

Accounts Receivable — Other 404 . 82 

Investments at Book Value 840,823 . 70 

Eleanor Tudor Trust 7,942.50 

Capital Assets 606,195 . 92 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to buildings .... 61,050 . 82 
Library 46,580.47 

$606,195.92 

Deferred Charges 11,214 . 31 

Spring Show, 1955 $ 916.23 

Prepaid Insurance and Expense 4,270.21 

Inventory of Books, Binders, etc 6,027 . 87 



11,214.31 



,523,704.32 



Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities $ 41,550.48 

Accounts Payable $ 37,576 . 50 

Taxes Withheld 1,776.97 

Accrued Commissions — "Horticulture" .... 1,154. 05 

Social Security Taxes Accrued 178.50 

Credit Balances Accounts Receivable 864.46 



$ 41,550.48 

Deferred Income 180 . 00 

Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 8,51 1 . 92 

Principal $ 7,942 . 50 

Unexpended Income 569 . 42 

$ 8,511.92 
53 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Sundry Funds $811,797.17 

Special Uses: 

Principal $241,098.66 

Unexpended Income 4,392 . 48 

$245,491.14 
General Uses: 

Principal 566,306 . 03 

$811,797.17 

Capital 564,524. 70 

Surplus (Capital) 148,466 . 88 

Balance, January 1, 1954 $130,972. 13 

Add: Net gain on securities sold 17,494. 75 

$148,466.88 

Deficit (Earned) 57,326.83 

$1,523,704.32 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income 

1954 1953 

Income from Investments $ 65,975 . 01 $ 56,281 . 18 

Membership Fees (after member's subscription 

to Horticulture) 34,750 . 78 33,976 . 02 

Rentals 11,134.53 11,143.28 

Spring Show 95,610.87 98,060.82 

125th Anniversary and Loan Exhibit 12,036.97 

Autumn Show 7,051.02 

"Horticulture" Loss 74,395. 12 37,016.37 

Other Receipts 413.75 1,076.13 

$121,452.85 $162,470.04 



Expenditures 

Building Expenses $ 40,608.09 $ 46,788.09 

Library Expenses 16,512.33 15,946.11 

Office and General Salaries and Expenses. .... 75,267.64 61,224.46 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses 3,975 . 79 3,486 . 77 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates: 

Lectures paid from general funds 1,070.00 915.72 

54 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from gen- 
eral funds % 2,665.91 $ 2,131.26 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from 

Spring Show 41,660.02 41,800.65 

Medals, lectures, etc. paid from restricted 

funds 1,541.74 1,757.54 

Awards from shows paid from restricted funds 5,329 . 93 5,035 . 93 

$188,631.45 $179,087.07 

Net Loss — All Funds $ 67,178.60 $ 76,677.03 

Elimination of Expenses Included Above Paid 

From Income of Restricted Funds 9,071 . 48 9,253 . 46 

% 58,707.72 $ 7,363.57 
Elimination of Income Included Above Allo- 
cated to restricted funds $ 8,843 . 96 $ 8,843 . 96 

Net Loss — General Funds % 66,957.08 $ 76,207.53 




Exhibition of tropical plants at the North Shore Horticultural Show, by Mrs. 
William H. Moore, Manchester. Awarded a 125th Anniversary Award. 

55 



Books Added to the Library 

May 7, 1954— May 1, 1955 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Audus, L.J. Plant growth substances. London, 1953 

Barton, L. V. & Crocker, W. 20 years of seed research at the Boyce Thompson 

Institute for Plant Research. London, 1948 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Gardeners' handbook. New York, 1953 

. Handbook on plant hormones. New York, 1952 

. Pruning handbook. New York, 1952 

Caldwell, Sam. The garden gate. New York, 1954 

Christopher, E. P. The pruning manual. New York, 1954 

Farrington, E. I. The gardener's almanac; 11th ed. Boston, 1949 

. Twenty-five historic years; the history of the Massachusetts Horticultural 

Society. Boston, 1955 
The Gardeners' reference guide. Chicago, 1954 

Hellyer, A. G. L. The encyclopaedia of garden work and terms. London, 1954 
Hume, H. H. Gardening in the Lower South; rev. ed. New York, 1954 
International Horticultural Congress, 13th. Report. London, 1952 
John Innes Horticultural Institution. The fruit, the seed and the soil; 2d ed. 

London, 1949 
Melady, J. H. The home owners' complete garden handbook. New York, 1954 
National horticultural magazine. Vegetative propagation, ed. by J. L. Creech. 

Washington, D. C, 1954 
Phillips, C. E. The small garden. London, 1952 
Popular gardening ideas. New York, 1954 
Pratt, A. J. Gardening made easy. New York, 1955 
Shoemaker, J. S. General horticulture. Philadelphia, 1952 
Shoemaker, J. S. & Teskey, B.J. E. Practical horticulture. New York, 1955 
Whiting, J. R., ed. A treasury of American gardening. New York, 1955 
Wickenden. Leonard. Gardening with nature. New York, 1954 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Soils 
The Care and feeding of garden plants. Washington, D. C, 1954 
Collings, G. H. Commercial fertilizers; 5th ed. New York, 1955 
Laughlin, C. S. Fertile soil from the sea. Portland, Me., 1954 
Millar, C. E. Soil fertility. New York, 1955 

Diseases and pests 

Clausen, L. W. Insect facts and folklore. New York, 1954 

Eadie, W. R. Animal control in field, farm and forest. New York, 1954 

Headstrom, Richard. Garden friends and foes. New York, 1954 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Articles on bulbs. New York, 1947 
. Dwarf potted trees or Bonsai. New York, 1950 

56 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

— — . Garden paths. New York, 1951 

. Handbook on vines. New York, 1954 

. Trees for special purposes. New York, 1946 

Garleton, R. M. Hardy bulbs. New York, 1955 

Everett, T. H. American gardener's book of bulbs. New York, 1954 

Free, Montague. All about the perennial garden. New York, 1955 

Hottes, A. C. The book of shrubs; 6th ed. New York, 1952 

Jenkins, D. H. & Wilson, H. van P. House plants for every window. New York, 1954 

Johnson, M. P. Perennials. New York, 1955 

Peters, R. M. Bulb magic in your window. New York, 1954 

Steffek, E. F. Wild flowers and how to grow them. New York, 1954 

Watkins, J. V. & Wolfe, H. S. Your Florida garden. Gainesville, 1954. 

Woollard, Leslie. Japanese and miniature gardens. London, 1954 

Wright, Richardson. Greedy gardeners. Philadelphia, 1955 

Monographs 

American Camellia Society. American camellia yearbook. Gainesville, Ga., 

1954 
Bedson, F. J. Successful begonia culture. London, 1955 
Bennett, R. W., comp. Studies in penstemon, no. 1 : Habranthus. Arlington, 

Va., 1953 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Lilies, kinds and culture. New York, 1949 
Brown, W. A. Tuberous begonias; rev. ed. New York, 1955 
Clifford, Derek. Geraniums. London, 1953 
Hertrich, William. Camellias in the Huntington Gardens. San Marino, Calif., 

1954 
Hillery, W. O. Complete culture of tuberous rooted begonias. Seattle, 1954 
Kiplinger, D. C. Greenhouse and garden chrysanthemums. New York, 1954 
McKee, W.J. Half century of iris. Worcester, Mass., 1954 
Nisbet, E. C. Pleasure in growing chrysanthemums. Seattle, 1954 
Redoute, P. J. Roses, selected and introduced by Eva Mannering. London, 1954 
Stevens, Jean. The iris and its culture. Melbourne, Australia, 1952 
Taylor, H. C. and Genders, Roy. Primroses and polyanthus. London, 1954 
Westcott, Cynthia. Anyone can grow roses; 2d ed. New York, 1954 
Wilson, H. van P. Climbing roses. New York, 1955 
Wister, J. C. & Wolfe, H. E. The tree peonies. Washington, D. C, 1955 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HERBS 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Fruits for the home garden. New York, 1951 

— . Herbs; history, use, culture. New York, 1950 

Burrage, A. C. Burrage on vegetables. New York, 1954 

Reed, C. & Davidson, J. Improved nut trees of North America and how to grow 

them. New York, 1954 
Shoemaker, J. S. Vegetable growing; 2d ed. New York, 1953 
Talbert, T. J. Growing fruit and vegetable crops. Philadelphia, 1953 
Weschcke, Carl. Growing nuts in the North. St. Paul, 1954 
Whitehead, S. B. Fruit from trained trees. London, 1954 

AGRICULTURE 

Butler, C. G. The world of the honeybee. New York, 1955 

Day, C. A. A history of Maine agriculture, 1604-1860. Orono, 1954 

Fussell, G. E. The farmer's tools 1500-1900. London, 1952 

57 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Hills, L. D. Russian comfrey. London, 1953 

Matson, R. A. Cooking by the garden calendar. New York, 1955 

Yohe, R. S. What our farmers can learn from other lands. Ames, Iowa, 1953 

NATURAL HISTORY 

Ford Motor Co. Pub'ns Dept., ed. Ford treasury of the outdoors. New York, 

1952 
Goin, O. B. World outside my door. New York, 1955 
Wildman, E. E. This week out of doors, a nature calendar. Narberth, Pa., 1954 

COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES 

Garris, E. W. Teaching vocational agriculture. New York, 1954 

Royal Horticultural Society. The horticultural show handbook. London, 1953 

Child-Smith, F. C. The first book of conservation. New York, 1954 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Bailey, Ralph, ed. Landscaping plans for small homes. New York, 1954 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. American gardens. New York, 1953 

. Dwarf and low-growing or slow-growing plants. New York, 1949 

. Flowering shrubs. New York, 1951 

. Flowering trees. New York, 1950 

. Handbook on garden construction. New York, 1954 

Clark, W. H. Gardening for color. Boston, 1954 

Dustan, Alice. Landscaping your home. New York, 1955 

Enright, L. J. Woody plants for landscape use in the northeastern United States. 

State College, Pa., 1955 
Gardens and gardening, v. 5: Labour-saving planning and planting, ed. by F. A. 

Mercer and R. Hay. London, 1954 
Grant, J. A. Garden design illustrated. Seattle, 1954 

Heine, C. W. A history of national capital parks. Washington, D. C, 1953 
Hill, A. L. The homeowner's guide to landscaping. New York, 1954 
Johnson, A. T. The Mill garden. London, 1950 

Korbobo, R. P. Complete home landscaping and garden guide. New York, 1954 
Parcher, E. S. Shady gardens. New York, 1955 
Polster, E. & Fahsbender, M. Garden lighting. New York, 1954 
Rouse, Parke, jr. The city that turned back time. Williamsburg, Va., 1952 
Saros, Theodore. Christmas lighting and decorating outdoors and indoors. New 

York, 1954 
Stewart, Shan. Planning and building your patio. New York, 1954 
Synge, Patrick. A diversity of plants. London, 1953 

Trend Books, inc. 15 basic ways to landscape your home. Los Angeles, 1954 
Wyman, Donald. The Arnold Arboretum garden book. New York, 1954 

BOTANY 

General 
Edinburgh. Royal Botanic Garden. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh 

[guidebook] 1948 
Emerson, F. W. Basic botany; 2d ed. New York, 1954 

Featherly, H. I. Taxonomic terminology of the higher plants. Ames, Iowa, 1954 
Guilcher, J. M. & Noailles, R. H. The hidden life of flowers. New York, 1954 
Redoute, P.J. Album de Redoute . . . from the edition of 1824, by S. Sitwell and 

R. Madol. London, 1954 

58 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Sinnott, E. W. Botany, principles and problems; 5th ed. New York, 1955 
Tukey, H. B. Plant regulators in agriculture. New York, 1954. 

Monographs 

Carlson, Raymond, ed. The flowering cactus ... of America's Southwest. 
" > .New York, 1954 

Fischer, G. W. Manual of the North American smut fungi. New York, 1953 
Marshall, W. T. Arizona's cactuses; 2d ed. Tempe, Arizona, 1953 
Weatherwax, Paul. Indian corn in old America. New York, 1954 

Floras — U. S. 

Kieran, John. Introduction to trees. New York, 1954 

Little, E. L. Check list of native and naturalized trees of the United States 

(including Alaska). Washington, D. C, 1953 
Pistorius, Anna. What tree is it? New York, 1955 
Rydberg, P. A. Flora of the Rocky Mountains and adjacent plains; 2d ed. New 

York, repr. 1954 

ESSAYS AND POETRY 

Councilman, E. C. Two cats and forty camellias. New York, 1954 

Hadfield, Miles, ed. The gardener's album. London, 1954 

Lape, Fred. A bunch of flowers. Albany, N. Y., 1954 

Lyman, W. W. &|Hood, M. J. California wild flowers in verse and picture. 1939 

FINE ARTS 

Klute, Jeannette, photographer. Woodland portraits. Boston, 1954 

Knoedler Galleries. "Flowers", by French painters (XIX-XX centuries). New 

York, 1932. 
Roche, J. P. & M.A. Photographing your flowers. New York, 1954 
Royal Horticultural Society. Exhibition of manuscripts, books, drawings . . . 

at the 1 50th anniversary celebration. London, 1 954 
Van Huysum, Jan, illus. Jan Van Huysam, by M. H. Grant. Leighton-on-Sea, 

Eng., 1954 

FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 

Allen, E. G. Japanese flower arrangement in a nutshell; 2d ed. Augusta, Ga., 

1952 
Brooks, M. J. Flower arrangement workbook 3. New York, 1955 
Clements, J. 101 ideas for flower arrangement. London, 1953 
Cyphers, E. H., ed. Holiday flower arrangements. New York, 1954 
Goldson, Rae. Contemporary flower arrangement. New York, 1955 
Hale, Emma, comp. Northwest flower arrangements. Seattle, 1954 
Ishimoto, Tatsuo. The art of plant and driftwood arrangement. New York, 1954 
Ohara, Houn. Flower arrangements of the Ohara school; new ed., v. 1. Kyoto, 

Japan, 1952 
Rockwell, F. F. & Grayson, E. F. The complete book of flower arrangement. 

New York, 1947 
Swift, Loret. Flower arranging book. New York. 1954 
Yates, M. W. The complete flower hobby book. New York, 1955 

59 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

BIOGRAPHY 

Herbst, Josephine. New green world. New York, 1954 

Pond, M. B. Heaven in a wildflower. New York, 1954 

Price, Robert. Johnny Appleseed, man and myth. Bloomington, Ind., 1954 

Who knows who and what; rev. ed. Chicago, 1954 

TRAVEL AND PLANT HUNTING 

Degener, Otto. The last cruise of the "Cheng-ho". New York, 1943 
Howes, P. G. The giant cactus forest and its world. Pasadena, Calif., 1954 
Hunt, Sir John. The conquest of Everest. New York, 1954. 
Roger-Smith, Hugh. Plant hunting in Europe. Bedford, Eng., 1950 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Educational film guide; 11th ed., completely rev.; and supplements to date. New 

York, 1954-55 
Filmstrip guide; 3d ed., completely rev.; and supplements to date. New York, 

1954-55. 
Merrill, E. D. A botanical bibliography of the islands of the Pacific. Washington, 

D. C, 1947 
Union list of serials; 2d ed., supplement 1944-1949. New York, 1954 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts to the Library 
from the following donors: 

Allen, Ellen Gordon 

Allen, E. G. Japanese flower arrangement in a nutshell; 2d ed. 1952 
Andrews, Nelson I. 

Whiting, J. R., ed. A treasury of American gardening. 1955 
At water, Harold 

Bailey, L. H. The horticulturist's rule book. 1895 

Barnes, J. & Robinson, W. Asparagus culture. 1881 

Elliott, F. R. Handbook for fruit growers; new ed. 1883 

Ellwanger, H. B. The rose. 1882 

Fuller, A. S. Small fruit culturist. 1889 

Henderson, P. Gardening for profit. 1889 

Henderson, P. Practical floriculture. 1893 
Bickford, Ethel 

Gathorne-Hardy, R. Garden flowers from plates by Jane Loudon. 1948 
Boutell, Frank J. 

Sedgwick, M. C. The garden month by month. 1907 
Buffum, Jesse 

The old farmer's almanac, 1947-1950 
Burrage, Albert Cameron, jr. 

L'Abrege des bons fruits; rev. 1675 

Bonnefons, N. de. Le jardinier frangois; derniere ed. 1679 

Mollet, C. Theatre des jardinages. 1678 
Cabot, Mrs. Sewall 

Parkinson, J. Paradisi in sole. 1904 
Foley, Daniel J. 

Hillery, W. O. Complete culture of tuberous rooted begonias. 1954 
Fox, Mrs. M. F. 

Herb Society of America. New York Unit. Herb lists. 1954 

60 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Guild, Miss Helen, in memory of Mr. George G. Whittemore. 

Wild flowers of America. 1894 
Haverhill Public Library 

Bailey, L. H. Sketch of the evolution of our native fruits. 1898 

Conard, H. S. and Hus, H. Water lilies and how to grow them. 1907 

Northend, M. H. Garden ornaments. 1916 

Wilder, L. B. Adeventures in a suburban garden. 1931 

. My garden. 1921 

. Pleasures and problems of a rock garden. 1928 

. What happens in my garden. 1935 

Wilson, E. H. America's greatest garden. 1925 
Hemming, Mrs. George B. 

Dewey, G. Report on the herbaceous plants of Massachusetts. 1840 
Houghton, Mrs. Clement S. 

Alpine Garden Society. Quarterly bulletin. 1945-1954 

. Yearbook, 1946-1947 

American Horticultural Society. Bulletins no. 3-4. 

Fernald, M. L. Persistence of plants in unglaciated areas of boreal America. 
1925 

National Horticultural magazine, 1937-1954 

New flora and silva, 1928-1940 

Shaw, G. R. The genus pinus. 1914 

Torrey, J. The comparative anatomy ... of the coniferales, pt. 3 

Vilmorin, P. L. Hortus Vilmorinianus. 1906 

Vilmorin, M. L. Fruticetum Vilmorinianum. 1904 

Wilson, E. H. The conifers and taxads of Japan. 1916 
Kingsbury, Mrs. S. M. 

Jekyll, G. & Weaver, L. Gardens for small country houses. 1924 
Nehrling, Arno H. 

Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture. An outline of the history of 
the Society. 1942 
Perkins, Mrs. John Carroll 

Collection of slides of gardens and garden plants. 

Files of standard garden magazines. 
Scofield, Edward. 

Newhall, C. S. The trees of northeastern America. 1892 

Scott, F. J. The art of beautifying suburban home grounds. 1870 
Swift & Co. 

The gardeners' reference guide. 1954 
Taloumis, George 

Lyman, W. W. California wild flowers in verse and picture. 1939 
Taylor, Millicent J. 

Redoute, P. J. Roses, sel. by Eva Mannering. 1954 
Vose, Robert C, jr. 

Knoedler Galleries. "Flowers" by French painters. 1932 
Watson, Mrs. George 

North American Lily Society. The Lily yearbook, no. 6. 1953 
Wells, Miss Edna F. 

Harding, A. R. Ginseng and other medicinal plants; rev. ed. 1936 
Witherby, Mr. 

Clay, J. C. Cupid's almanac and guide to hearticulture. 1908. 

Phelan, C. E. Flora biography; 4th Amer. ed. 1843 

61 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 

With the close of another year, Fruit and Flower Mission has 
completed eighty-six years of service in Boston. 
The value of this service and the sincere appreciation of the recipients 
is realized in the many letters which come to this office through the year. A 
recent letter contained these lines, "Easter will always be a happy time to 
remember kind friends and loving thoughts as long as we have Fruit and Flower 
Mission. We shall always know that some one is thinking of us." 

Eight hundred and twenty-two hampers and cartons of flowers, fruits and 
vegetables were received from twenty-seven towns and distributed from seven 
distributing centers, including the office in Horticultural Hall. 

Six hundred and twenty-one baskets and trays were delivered during the 
holiday seasons of Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter. Extra dainties and 
gifts in each basket and tray brought the real Christmas spirit into many 
lonely places. A lovely Begonia plant carried a living message of thought to one 
hundred of our elderly friends in nursing homes and shut-ins. 

The Boston State Hospital program, with one ward of sixty-five mentally 
ill women, has been carried on each month. These patients have found interest 
and relaxation from the hospital routine in six indoor parties during the 
winter. A musical program with community singing and several soloists 
furnish the entertainment. 

Forty of our elderly people have lovely memories of the Spring Flower Show 
through the kindness of one member of Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 
This treat has been given by this member for many years and is "a day of days" 
for those who are privileged to attend. Another member sent two tickets; these 
were given to one person who is eighty-six and her friend who is seventy-five 
years old. A third member gave a one year membership to the Society. 

The growth of our service during the past thirty years has been possible, in 
part, by the interest and co-operation of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
in the use of our office and the many privileges which we enjoy. The kindness 
of the exhibitors at the various shows which are held here, has been appreciated 
by hundreds of lonely people in nursing homes, hospitals, institutions and in 
places where the message that only flowers can bring is sorely needed. 

The interest and thought given by Mr. George Taloumis, Staff Horticul- 
turalist of the Society, in his finely written article about the work of Fruit 
and Flower Mission, in the Boston Globe of April 10th, is sincerely appreciated. 

The value of our volunteers can not be adequately expressed in words. 
They are indispensable. The same willingness to "share" is evident season after 
season: the faithful who come through the warm days to care for the flowers 
and those who come during the busy holiday seasons, all with the same spirit 
of true volunteer service. The same is true of all who are a part of the work in 
many ways, the contributors who give so generously, the drivers who make the 
deliveries in the summer and especially during the holiday seasons. We are 
grateful to the railroads for the courtesy extended for so many years and to 
the baggagemen for the careful handling of the hampers. 

Esther L. Camfield 
Executive Secretary 

62 



NECROLOGY 



Miss Mary P. Abbot 

Mr. Earle L. Adams 

Edward E. Adams, M.D. 

Mrs. Sarah W. Ambrose 

Mrs. Warren Ames 

Mrs. William R. Arnold 

Mr. Peter Arnott 

Mr. William H. Bacon 

Mrs. F. E. Bateman 

Mr. Hubert Beales 

Miss Eliza R. Birnie 

George N. Bishop, M.D. 

Dr. Herbert F. Boles 

Mrs. Hildegarde Bonzagni 

Mrs. George Booth 

Mr. A. W. Bridges 
Mr. Ernest W. Brigham 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 
Miss Alice Bullard 
Mrs. M. Josephine Butler 
Mrs. Sewall Cabot . 
Mr. Walter Channing 
Mrs. Walter B. Chase 
Miss Marguerite Childs 
Miss Grace L. Clark 
Mr. Thomas J. Clarke 
Mr. Charles K. Cummings 
Mrs. Clarence W. Daniels 
Mr. Charles H. Dennison 
Mrs. J. Morton De Wolfe 
Mr. Walter C. Dexter 
Miss Helen Durgin 
Mr. G. H. Edgell 
Miss Mary S. Eustis 
Mr. Vincent Farnsworth 
Mrs. J. Malcolm Forbes 
Mrs. William S. Forbes 
Mr. Arthur L. Foss 
Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 
Mrs. George P. Gardner 
Mrs. J. Arthur Garrod 
Mr. William H. Gates 
Mr. Herman F. Gramstorff 



Mrs. Willard E. Grant 
Mrs. Reginald Gray 
Mrs. Frank G. Hale 
Mr. Merrill G. Hastings 
Mrs. Abby Barbara Henke 
Miss Ada H. Hersey 
Mrs. Franklin W. Hobbs 
Mr. Chester A. Jordan 
Mrs. Carl F. Kaurmann 
Mr. Carl Tilden Keller 
Mrs. Carl Tilden Keller 
Mrs. John F. Kelly 
Mr. Davis B. Keniston 
Mrs. Gardiner M. Lane 
Miss Jessie P. Learoyd 
Dr. Timothy Leary 
Mr. Harry E. E. Lindley 
Mrs. Frank K. Linscott 
Mrs. Charles O. Littlefield 
Miss Eva D. Lother 
Mrs. George H. Lyman 
Miss Christina MacLennan 
Miss Helen P. Margesson 
Mrs. Earl R. Martin 
Mr. John R. C. McBeath 
Mrs. Frank R. McCullagh 
Mrs. Lewis J. McHardy 
Mrs. Elizabeth P. McKenna 
Dr. Samuel C. Mintz 
Mrs. William H. Moore 
Mrs. Isabelle Murray 
Mrs. Allen E. Newton 
Miss Ellen N. Nolan 
Mrs. John Nolen 
Miss Angeline P. Nutter 
Mr. Charles Everett O'Neil 
Mrs. Herbert Foster Otis 
Mrs. James L. Paine 
Miss Anna H. Payson 
Miss Elizabeth D. Peabody 
Miss Gertrude Peet 
Mrs. Bryan S. Permar 
Mrs. Henry H. Perry 



Mrs. Sheffield Phelps 

Mrs. Joseph N. Podrasnik 

Miss Rosamond Porter 

Mrs. Isabelle S. Potter 

Mr. Thomas E. Proctor 

Mrs. William J. Regan 

Mr. Thomas L. Reynolds 

Mr. Everett L. Rich 

Prof. Walter W. Robertson 

Mrs. Jane W. Root 

Mr. George Russell 

Mrs. Joseph A. Schumpeter 

Mr. Andrew S. Seiler 

Miss Clara E. Smith 

Mr. William R. C. Stephenson 

Miss Katharine H. Stone 

Mrs. Henry B. Stowell 

Mr. Robert Swan Sturtevant 

Mr. Frank A. Sullivan 

Mr. Alfred N. Taylor 

Miss Elizabeth F. Taylor 

Mrs. Thomas Taylor Jr. 

Miss Hilda Tedford 

Miss Elizabeth B. Thacher 

Mr. Alfred M. Tozzer 

Miss Luella Turner 

Mr. Edwin J. Twomey 

Mrs. Walter F. Urbach 

Mrs. Winthrop H. Wade 

Mr. Chester A. Walgreen 

Mr. William Walker 

Miss M. Gertrude Ward 

Mr. W. E. Ward 

Mr. Chester D. Wedrick 

Mr. Albert E. West 

Dr. E. B. Whiting 

Mrs. Geoffrey Whitney 

Mrs. R. S. Wilkins 

Mr. Edward Winkler 

Mr. Harold E. Winn 

Mr. Albert B. Wood 

Dr. William Worthy 

Mrs. Philip W. Wrenn 



63 



Honorary Members 



1942 Frederick Law Olmstead, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. A. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. O. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 

1945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 
1947 James J. Hurley, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1 947 Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1948 Ernest Borowski, Norwood, Massachusetts 
1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 
1948 John L. Russell, Dedham, Massachusetts 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, California 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Free, New York, New York 
1950 Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Tegucigalpa, Honduras 
1950 Kenneth Post, Ithaca, New York 

1950 George L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 William Hertrich, San Marino, California 
1951 Dr. Samuel L. Emsweller, Beltsville, Maryland 
1951 Jan de Graaff, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Mary May Binney, Milton, Massachusetts 

1952 Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburgh, Scotland 
1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammerts, La Canada, California 
1952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Columbus, Ohio 

1952 Dr. Donald Forsha Jones, New Haven, Conn. 

1952 Mrs. Beatrix Farrand, Bar Harbor, Maine 

1953 Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 
1953 Arie F. den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa 

1953 Dr. Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio 

1953 Fred Edmunds, Portland, Oregon 

1953 Mrs. Bessie Raymond Buxton, Peabody, Massachusetts 

1954 Mr. Arnold Davis, Cleveland, Ohio 

1954 Mr. Edward I. Farrington, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1954 Mr. Joseph Lane, New York, New York 

1954 Mr. Francis Meilland, Alpes-Maritimes, France 

1955 Dr. Richard P. White, Washington, D. C. 

1955 Mr. Paul Vossberg, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1955 Mr. Peter Arnott, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1955 Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1955 Miss Sarah E. Brassill, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

64 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

For 125 years the Massachusetts Horticultural Society has been favored 
by the generosity of its members whose patronage has made possible an 
Endowment Fund for carrying on its multitudinous activities for the promotion 
of horticulture in this Commonwealth. Furthermore, the Society has con- 
tributed greatly to the ever-increasing development of horticultural influence 
and achievement throughout the country. It is hoped that the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society will be remembered by those members who wish to 
distribute their funds for public benefaction in the fields of the arts and sciences. 
All bequests are tax-exempt. This Society enjoys an enviable reputation for 
its solid financial condition and its judicious method of handling investments. 
Since expenses for maintenance and activities are ever on the increase, addi- 
tional funds are needed to carry on and to extend the services of this Society — 
"for the advancement of horticulture." 



Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, 

the sum of to be used as the Board 

of Trustees may direct for the promotion of horti- 
culture in its various forms and for extending the 
activities of the Society along educational lines. 

Signed 



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YEARBOOK 1956 

MASSACHUSETTS 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

PRICE ONE DOLLAR 



1956 

FLOWER SHOWS 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 

January 19 and 20 
Camellia Show 

March 11 to 17 (Mechanics Rlclg. ) 
Spring Show 

May 7 and 8 
Daffodil Show 

May 25 and 26 
Tulip Show 

June 12 and 13 
Iris Show 

June 25 and 26 
Rose S/iot£ 

August 17 and 18 
Gladiolus Show 

August 22 and 23 
Exhibition of the Products of Children s Gardens 

October 18, 19, 20 and 21 
Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show 



(Dates subject to change) 



1956 YEARBOOK 

of the 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS 

for 
1955 

AND A LIST OF BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 



FOREWORD— The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the 33rd number of the Society's Yearbook, 
with which are combined the annual reports for the year 1955. 

Boston, Massachusetts, September 1, 1956 Stedman Buttrick, Chairman 

V 




Mr. Milford Lawrence 
Elected a Trustee, May 7, 1956 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 7 

Reports of Officers and Committees 9 

President's Address 9 

Report of the Secretary 12 

Results of the Balloting 16 

Report of Committee on Exhibitions 18 

Report on Children's Gardens 19 

Report of Prize Committee 20 

Garden Committee Awards 21 

Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 26 

Report of Library Committee 29 

Special Medal Awards 30 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1955 35 

Report of the Treasurer 44 

Books Added to the Library 49 

A Botanical Treasure 57 

Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 61 

Necrology 62 

Honorary Members 63 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 64 

Front Cover Illustration 

This captivating bloom of the Night-Blooming Cereus was snapped at the 
height of its fragile beauty by photographer Capt. Lawrence G. Heinrich, 
Sewanee Military Academy, after many hours of waiting. The bloom seems so 
real that one can almost catch its fragrance. 

Back Cover Illustration 

"Electra", one of Dr. Norma Pfeiffer's breathtaking new auratum hybrid 
lilies. It won an Award of Merit at the 1955 annual Lily Show. Photo was 
taken in the garden of Dr. George O. Clark, Newburyport, Mass. 

The photographs for the 1956 Yearbook are the work of Paul E. 
Genereux, except where otherwise designated. 




COLORFUL MONACO Flower Market on the French Riviera, 
staged by Fishelson the Florist, Boston, Mass., at the 1956 Spring 
Flower Show. 

Awarded a Gold Medal 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 

Vice Presidents 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Trustees 
John S. Ames* Harold W. Knowlton (1958) 

Ernest Borowski (1959) Milford Lawrence (1959) 

Albert C. Burrage (1957) Mrs. William A. Parker (1957) 

Aubrey B. Butler (1958) Mrs. James Perkins (1958) 

Stedman Buttrick* Harold S. Ross (1959) 

Dr. George O. Clark (1958) Harold D. Stevenson (1959) 

Edward Dane (1957) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1959) 

Walter Hunnewell (1957) Mrs. Edwin S. Webster (1959) 

Seth L. Kelsey (1957) Oliver Wolcott* 

Donald Wyman (1958) 

Treasurer 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Assistant Treasurer 
OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 

*Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 

5 



MHHHHI 

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PRESIDENT JOHN S. AMES, right, presents the Albert C. Burrage 
Gold Vase to Wilfrid Wheeler of Falmouth, Mass., for a superb 
planting of holly in a natural setting, staged at Horticultural Hall, by 
Alexander I. Heimlich. 




VICE-PRESIDENT OLIVER WOLCOTT, left, presents a Silver 
Medal to Harold W. Knowlton of Auburndale, Mass., for a well 
designed and maintained garden, featuring iris. 

6 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 
For the Year Ending May 1> 1957 

Executive Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK EDWARD DANE 

WALTER HUNNEWELL OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Finance Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK EDWARD DANE 

Budget Committee 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK EDWARD DANE 

WALTER HUNNEWELL OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Membership Committee 
HAROLD KNOWLTON, Chairman 
AUBREY B. BUTLER HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Exhibitions 

SETH L. KELSEY, Chairman 
EDWARD DANE MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 

DR. JOHN R. HAVIS HAROLD D. STEVENSON 

Committee on Prizes 

ERNEST BOROWSKI, Chairman 
THOMAS MILNE, Co-Chairman 
JOHN HURLEY HAROLD KNOWLTON 

MILFORD LAWRENCE 

Committee on Library 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK MRS. EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 

EDWARD DANE, Chairman 

STEDMAN BUTTRICK ERNEST HOFTYZER HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Special Medals 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 
ERNEST BOROWSKI SETH L. KELSEY 

HAROLD KNOWLTON MILFORD LAWRENCE 

Committee on Gardens 

OLIVER WOLCOTT, Chairman 
MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER MRS. JAMES PERKINS 

HAROLD D. STEVENSON DR. DONALD WYMAN 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Committee on Building 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK OLIVER WOLCOTT 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 
MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR HENRY G. WENDLER 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, Chairman 
ERNEST BOROWSKI SETH L. KELSEY 

MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER MRS. JAMES PERKINS 

Nominating Committee 

AUBREY B. BUTLER, Chairman 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK HAROLD KNOWLTON 

MRS. JAMES PERKINS DR. DONALD WYMAN 




TERRACE GARDEN designed by Bartlett Gardens, Hamilton, 
Mass., at the 1956 Spring Flower Show. 

Awarded a Gold Medal 




EXHIBIT OF ACACIAS by Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, 
Mass., at the 1956 Spring Flower Show. 

Awarded a Gold Medal 

8 



Reports of Officers and Committees 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 7, 1956 

The Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
held at Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 7, 1956, at 3 P.M. with the 
President, Mr. John S. Ames, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Mrs. 
Claire Rochefort, Miss Anne Sullivan, Miss Elizabeth Munro and Mr. 
George Taloumis. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the 
meeting. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous Annual 
Meeting was waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 



The President's Address 

as your President, I am very happy to report that the society 
/=\ has had a very successful year. Since January 1, 1956, we 
have enrolled 1,800 new members and our membership at 
the present time totals 16,700. 

Our magazine Horticulture is attracting wide attention but it 
continues to be a serious problem because of high publication 
costs. 

We are expanding our educational program by offering more 
courses in practical gardening. Our lectures continue to be well 
attended. 

Our Committee on Exhibitions staged a beautiful spring flower 
show. A two-day blizzard at the end of the week seriously affected 
our attendance. 

Our building is in excellent condition. 

Mr. Nehrling, our Executive Secretary, will report in detail on 
the major activities of the society. 

John S. Ames 
President 



:-:;::,-::4 ; -.:.S,« 




MRS. LUCIEN B. TAYLOR of Dover, Mass., right foreground, con- 
ducts the laboratory session in one of the daytime gardening courses 
at Horticultural Hall 




10 




Fay 

WILLIAM JENNINGS left, Superintendent of Greenhouses, Welles- 
ley College Botany Department, accepts The Bulkley Medal of the 
Garden Club of America for Wellesley College's educational exhibit of 
house plants, at the Spring Flower Show 




Fay 

OLIVER WOLCOTT left, presents a Silver Medal to Gordon V. 
Comer, Clerk of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston, Mass., 
for their formal garden which exemplifies perfection of culture 

11 



Report of the Secretary 

It is my privilege as Executive Secretary of your Society to report on 
the activities for the past twelve months. It has been a busy and 
eventful year because of the widespread and growing interest in hor- 
ticulture, especially among the ever increasing number of home owners 
in our suburban localities who are eager for information. The requests for 
information and assistance, on the part of our membership and the public 
at large, are constantly growing, and our staff makes every effort to meet 
these additional inquiries in a helpful and efficient manner. 

Requests come by telephone, mail and personal visits. The regular 
members of the staff, in handling these problems, were taxed to capacity 
and often interrupted in their routine work. To solve this problem we 
were fortunate to secure the services of Robert Wyman, of an old New 
England horticultural family, a graduate of the Stockbridge School, with 
training in horticultural establishments in Europe, California and New 
England. He has become "The Question and Answer Man" and is giving 
a good account of himself. 

During the past year, Miss Brenda Newton resigned as a member of 
the staff, after nearly 22 years of notable service, first as librarian and 
later as associate editor of Horticulture. 

In addition to their regular duties, the members of the staff have found 
time to keep abreast of current horticultural events and to represent the 
Society at important national gatherings. Our editor, Mr. Daniel J. Foley, 
has covered various sections of the country. Through the generosity of 
Mr. Jan deGraaff, noted bulb grower of Gersham, Oregon, Mr. Foley was 
invited to his bulb growing establishment to supervise the making of a 
collection of color transparencies of lilies. During this two week period, 
he had an opportunity to visit many of the outstanding gardens through- 
out the state of Oregon and made a brief trip to Capitola, California, 
where he visited the Trial Gardens of Vetterle and Reinelt, hybridizers of 
tuberous rooted begonias, delphiniums, primroses and other garden flow- 
ers. He was also privileged to visit many other outstanding growers and 
participated in a special garden television program in Hollywood, in 
which our magazine Horticulture was featured. His vacation in Canada 
took him to the Montreal Botanical Garden and to the Botanical Gardens 
at Hamilton, Ontario. 

In October, Mr. Foley visited the Arthur Hoyt Scott Foundation at 
Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, Breeze Hill Gardens at Harrisburg, the Mor- 
ton Arboretum and the Garden Merchandiser Show at Chicago. He also 
consulted with the W. A. Krueger Company, Milwaukee, for the purpose 
of obtaining more accurate and effective color prints for Horticulture. 
A short trip to Williamsburg last month made it possible to obtain some 
excellent color transparencies for forthcoming issues of the magazine. 

Mr. George Taloumis, Miss Dorothy Manks and your secretary attended 
the American Horticultural Congress in Washington, D.C., where Miss 

12 



Manks staged an outstanding exhibit depicting the work of the Society. 
Mr. Richard Husselbee, our Advertising Manager, has made frequent 
trips to various parts of the country to secure additional advertising for 
Horticulture. He and your secretary attended Red Rose Rent Day at 
West Grove, Pennsylvania, conducted by the Conard-Pyle Company. 

The Society was invited to sponsor a Garden Tour to the Hawaiian 
Islands, together with the Pennsylvania and the Michigan Horticultural 
Societies and the Cleveland Garden Center. Your secretary was selected 
to serve as the Horticultural Tour Leader. There were 24 members in the 
group, with the majority from New England. It was the first conducted 
Garden Tour to the Islands from the East Coast and the Society received 
wide recognition for this pioneering effort. 

During the past year, we sponsored nine courses in various aspects of 
gardening. One hundred and sixty attended the sixty-four sessions. It is 
interesting to note that these courses were completely self-supporting, 
since all students paid fees which proved adequate in paying the four 
instructors. 

Mrs. LucienB. Taylor of Dover, who is widely known as an able teacher 
of gardening, presented four courses in "Practical Gardening" and two in 
"Home Greenhouse Practice." Mrs. Emily Henry Bush gave a course in 
"Photographing Flowers in Color." The course "Planning and Planting 
the Home Garden" was covered by two instructors, Miss Brenda E. New- 
ton and Mr. Frederick W. Swan. These courses were offered in response 
to public demand and proved exceedingly valuable as an additional serv- 
ice to our members. 

The Committee on Lectures and Publications again sponsored a winter 
and spring series. The winter series entitled a "Global Tour for Armchair 
Gardeners" included: 

"Photographing Flowers in Color," by Mrs. Emily Henry Bush, 
Brighton, Mass. 

"Trek to Lapland," by Dr. George S. Avery, Brooklyn Botanic 
Garden 

"Flowers of the Holy Land," by Miss Millicent Taylor, The Christian 
Science Monitor 

"Hawaii— Paradise of the Pacific," by Mr. Arno H. Nehrling 

"The Land of Mariana," by Dr. Harold N. Moldenke, Trailside Mu- 
seum, New Jersey 

"Colonial Williamsburg," by Mr. Alden Hopkins, Colonial Williams- 
burg, Va. 

The spring series included: 

"Dwarf Fruit Trees for the Home Garden," by Dr. Karl Sax, The 

Arnold Arboretum 
"Growing Roses in New England," by Mr. Karl P. Jones, President 

of the New England Rose Society 

13 



"Spanish and Portuguese Gardens," by Mrs. Patrick Villiers-Stuart, 

Norfolk, England 
"Making the Most of Garden Seeds," by Mr. Francis Coulter, New 

Haven, Conn. 
"Plan Before you Plant," by Miss Brenda E. Newton, Melrose, Mass. 
"Increasing Plants in the Home Garden," by Mr. Roger Coggeshall, 
The Arnold Arboretum 

Because of the popularity of the lectures, it was found necessary to 
charge a small fee for non-members so that our members would not be 
turned away. The fee has not affected the attendance and has nearly 
made the lectures self-supporting. 

For many years, the New England Wild Flower Preservation Society 
has occupied an office on the second floor. Since Horticulture needed 
additional editorial space, the Wild Flower Society was assigned quarters 
on the mezzanine floor and Mr. Foley took over their former office. The 
bleak space on the mezzanine has now been converted by Mrs. Lucien 
Taylor, President of the Wild Flower Society, and Mrs. Persis Green, the 
Secretary, into the most friendly, inviting quarters in the building. 

All through the year, Horticultural Hall is a mecca for meetings of 
horticultural groups and organizations and specialized plant societies. 
At times there are several groups meeting at the same time. Even with 
all the available space, our facilities are often taxed to capacity. 

During the past year, a number of important repairs and improvements 
have been made to the building. These include necessary roof repairs and 
the painting of the Presidents' Gallery, the library, the Trustees' Room 
and a new floor in the loggia. A new screen for the lecture hall was also 
purchased. 

As our President has already told you, our membership shows a sub- 
stantial increase. There are, however, hundreds of people in New England 
who do not yet know that membership is available to them. A concen- 
trated effort is being made to acquaint them with the advantages they 
may enjoy as members of our Society. 

The reports of the Garden Committee and the Special Medal Awards 
are reported separately in these pages. However, the presentation of 
awards of the Special Medals Committee deserves mention at this time. 
The George Robert White Medal, awarded to Dr. Harold L. Lyon of 
Honolulu, Hawaii, was presented to him by Mr. Harold Knowlton, a 
member of our Board of Trustees, at a special luncheon held in Dr. Lyon's 
honor at the Oahu Country Club, April 11. 

On the evening of the same day, Mr. Harold Ross, Chairman of the 
Committee, at a meeting of the Horticultural Club of Boston, presented 
our Large Gold Medal to Mr. W. Ormiston Roy of Montreal, Canada. 

On April 6, at the first Annual Meeting of the American Daffodil So- 
ciety in Washington, D. C, Mr. Daniel J. Foley presented the Thomas 
Roland Medal to Mr. Frank Reinelt of Capitola, California. 

Your secretary presented the Society's Large Gold Medal to Mrs. 
Arthur P. Teele at a spring meeting of her class here in Horticultural Hall. 

14 



Later, it will be my pleasure to hand the Jackson Dawson Medal to Mr. 
Eugene S. Boerner at Newark, New York. 

In spite of the bad weather, culminating in one of the severest blizzards 
encountered in recent years in New England, this year's Spring Flower 
Show attracted about 97,000 visitors. After paying all our bills, the project 
realized a small profit. In addition to the Spring Show, ten specialized 
shows were held at Horticultural Hall. The Iris Show, which had not been 
held for several years, was a most successful event and will be held again 
this year. 

The Lily Show, in which your Society cooperated, and the Annual 
Meeting of the North American Lily Society deserve special mention. It 
was the finest exhibition of lilies ever staged in this country. The flowers 
came from all parts of the United States, as well as Canada. Dr. George 
O. Clark, one of our Trustees, was a prominent exhibitor. He also served 
on the panel of experts and entertained the members of the Society at 
his Newburyport home. 

The contemplated changes and improvements in the Library, initiated 
by the Library Committee, are gradually taking shape. The new lighting 
is a distinct improvement and always brings forth favorable comment 
from all who use the library. 

Our magazine Horticulture continues to please our subscribers in 
all parts of the country. From a business standpoint, however, it continues 
to be our most serious problem, in relation to the other activities of the 
Society. A special committee appointed by the President is now studying 
the project. 

It now becomes my sad duty to report the passing of Dr. Elmer D. 
Merrill, former Director of the Arnold Arboretum and an active member 
of many of our important committees during his sixteen years as a mem- 
ber of our Board of Trustees. We also lost through death Mr. George 
Butterworth, a member of our Board for twenty -five years. He was a 
widely known orchid authority, internationally recognized, and an im- 
portant exhibitor at our flower shows. Another former member of the 
Board of Trustees, Mr. James Methven, passed away last October. In re- 
cent years he was a valued member of our Committee on Prizes. 

In closing may I say, in behalf of the members of the staff, that we are 
proud of the background, the prestige and the traditions of the Massachu- 
setts Horticultural Society. These attributes which are our heritage, we 
constantly strive to maintain. At this time, I wish to thank the Trustees 
and Officers and the Chairmen of the various Committees for their gen- 
erous cooperation. To the members of the staff go my sincerest thanks 
for their loyalty and tireless enthusiasm in behalf of the Society and its 
manifold activities. 

Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 



15 



Results of the Balloting at the Annual Meeting 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 81 votes having been cast, and 
the following persons were declared elected : 

President: John S. Ames 

Vice-President : Oliver Wolcott 

Trustees: (For three years) Mr. Ernest Borowski, Mr. Harold S. 
Ross, Mr. Harold D. Stevenson, Mrs. Roger S. Warner, Mr. 
Milford Lawrence; Trustee: (For two years) Mrs. Edwin S. Web- 
ster. 




ARNO H. NEHRLING, left, Executive Secretary, presents Eugene S. 
Boerner of the Jackson & Perkins Co., Newark, New York, with the 
Jackson Dawson Medal, for skill in the science of hybridizing roses. 




Fay 



16 



■ ■ 




'ill 



Fay 

JOHN S. AMES presents the President's Cup to Peter Mezitt, Weston 
Nurseries, Weston, Mass., for the Southern Garden, at the 1956 
Spring Flower Show. 



Fay 

OLIVER WOLCOTT, left, presents a Garden Certificate to William 
Backrow, of CBS HYTRON Division, Danvers, Mass., for blending 
the landscaping around their modern factory with the rural sur- 
roundings. 

17 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

y W ^his year the report of the Exhibition Committee is a brief account 



I 



of an eventful year. We were saddened through most of the year 
by the passing of our chairman, Mr. George W. Butterworth. For 
many years he gave devoted service to this and other committees and his 
loss is deeply felt. 

The regular small shows of the Society were held in Horticultural 
Hall as usual. These shows, all free to the public, except the Chrysanthe- 
mum Show, were of high quality and were well attended. 

The Spring Show of 1956 will be long remembered. Some will re- 
member the disastrous weather, which reduced our attendance by 25%. 
For the first time in history, the show was host to a number of people 
who had to spend the night in Mechanics Building. However, I like to 
think that most of us will remember the show not for reasons connected 
with the weather, but rather for the high quality of the exhibits and the 
unusually fine condition of the plants and flowers throughout the 
entire week. 

From the income of the Spring Show, we depend largely for funds 
to carry on our many free shows. It is hoped that a greatly increased 
membership will help to minimize the effect of our reduced income 
from the Spring Show and make it possible to carry on without any 
serious change from previous years. 

It is planned to combine the Chrysanthemum and Harvest Shows this 
fall into one enlarged and, we believe, more interesting show. If success- 
ful, this experiment may well be continued in future years. 

I would like to express publicly, my thanks to the other members of the 
Exhibition Committee. Throughout the year, they attended numerous 
meetings. But, more important, they have given unstintedly of their 
energy and experience toward our common aim, to have the best flower 
shows in the world. 

To all the exhibitors go our thanks for their cooperation and our 
admiration for their skill. Our many trade exhibitors are an important 
factor in the Flower Show picture. We hope that sunny skies and a 
larger attendance than ever before will make them happy at next spring's 
show. 

Most of all, your Exhibition Committee wishes to acknowledge its 
debt to Mr. Nehrling and all the staff at Horticultural Hall, whose de- 
voted and efficient cooperation make it a real pleasure to serve on this 
committee. The smooth operation of our shows and the excellent public- 
ity we receive are due to their efforts. 

With such cooperation we look forward confidently to the coming 
year and to the maintenance of the high standards of our shows. And 
may our Spring Show in 1957 be bigger and better than ever! 

Seth L. Kelsey, Chairman 
Committee on Exhibitions 

18 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

j / ' lf nj he 1955 garden season started with a rather severe drought 



T 



during May, especially in the Boston area. This condition handi- 
capped germination and many gardens were off to a poor start. 
July and early August were extremely hot, with more than thirty days 
when the thermometer rose to 90 degrees or higher in the shade. Coupled 
with the heat we had a short but severe drought the first sixteen days in 
August. Then the rains came August 17 and 18. Over fourteen inches of 
water fell in the Boston area in less than forty-eight hours which flooded 
out many of the gardens only a week before the show. The morning 
before the show, another heavy rain fell on the Boston area further 
flooding many gardens. Nearly all the show flowers, especially annuals, 
were ruined by the storm. 

The presence of a serious polio situation in this area further handi- 
capped the 1955 Children's Show. However, Executive Secretary Arno 
H. Nehrling decided to hold the Show but omitted the movies usually 
shown the first day while the judges are at work. Each garden teacher 
was instructed to bring not more than five children to Horticultural Hall 
to assist in setting up exhibits. Because of the polio situation the pres- 
ence of children, both the morning before the Show and during the 
Show, was noticeably less. 

In spite of the foregoing difficulties, however, the final count showed 
1,166 entries in the Annual Children's Show, somewhat under 1954, but 
the material was good, the arrangement excellent. All in all, it was a 
very colorful Show. The color contrasts of red and green tomatoes along 
with beets and carrots were particularly striking. The Press gave the 
Show better than usual publicity, especially the Boston Globe. 

The large School Garden on the Cummings Estate in Woburn, oper- 
ated by the Boston School Department in cooperation with the Park 
Department, as usual had an outstanding exhibit covering approxi- 
mately 150 square feet. This exhibit was so well done and the quality so 
near perfection, that the judges not only awarded it first prize but also 
the Society's Gold Medal. This is the third successive year that this 
garden has received this outstanding award at a Children's Show and 
it is the only school garden ever to receive the coveted Gold Medal of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

Encouraged by these awards the members of the staff and the 
children at this garden decided to go after big stakes in competition 
with adults at the Annual Harvest Show held in this building in Octo- 
ber. An excellent two hundred square foot display containing sixty-five 
different varieties of vegetables was staged. It was awarded first prize, a 
Gold Medal and a Cultural Certificate for the second successive year. 
The large display plus fifty-two entries in the individual classes netted 
the children $200.00 in prize money in competition with adults. 

19 



The 4-H Club exhibit in the upper hall, under the able direction of 
Earl H. Nodine, Assistant State Club Leader, had the usual fine quality 
and large number of exhibits. 

What started as a poor season for children's home and school gardens 
—droughts, floods and polio— ended as an excellent harvest year with 
the ideal growing weather of September and October as evidenced by 
the large number of winnings at the Harvest Show. 

Henry G. Wendler 
for the Committee on Children's Gardens 



T 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

-njhe annual report of the Prize Committee falls on the shoulders 
of the Co-Chairman, which he is happy to present, since it means 
that the Chairman and Mrs. Ernest Borowski are able to enjoy a 
well earned vacation in the Sunny South, rather than having to return to 
our unpredictable weather of the last few months. 

During the past year, the Prize Committee has attended ten shows 
and has held three meetings. These meetings were held to take care of 
extra committees for the larger shows and also to review the book of 
rules and the judges' lists. 

I would be remiss if I did not mention the loss of James Methven, one 
of the most devoted and conscientious members of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society. He had been a member for 39 years, 13 of which 
he served on the Prize Committee, 4 years as its chairman. He passed 
away October 27th, 1955, at the age of 76. Born in England in 1879, 
he served his apprenticeship there and came to the United States in 
the early 1900's. Having served on many of the noted private estates in 
the East, as superintendent, he was getting ready to retire, after over 60 
years in the gardening profession, when he passed away. 

President Ames has appointed Mr. John Hurley of Topsfield to serve 
on the Prize Committee in place of Mr. Methven. The Committee 
greatly appreciates his keen knowledge of horticulture. 

In behalf of the Prize Committee, I wish to commend the outstanding 
work of the exhibitors. The quality and condition of the materials 
exhibited was exceptional despite the adverse conditions. Last year, 
they were hampered by hurricanes, and this year by the cold, snow and 
lack of sunshine, before the Spring Show. Also the Prize Committee 
wishes to thank Mr. Nehrling and his staff who helped make the work 
of the committee a pleasure rather than a duty. 

Thomas Milne, Co-Chairman 
Committee on Prizes 

20 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Gardens, Oliver Wolcott, chairman. 

The Society's Garden Certificate: 

CBS HYTRON Division, Danvers. Large trees, shrubs, lawns and 
flowers blend this modern factory into its rural surroundings. 

The Society's Bronze Medal: 

Ketchopulos Market, Mr. George Ketchopulos, Proprietor, Rockport. 
From the arches of the colonnaded front which abuts the sidewalk, 
suspended lantanas drip down between tubs of hydrangeas, framing the 
display of fruits and vegetables whose vivid harvest colors are multiplied 
by an overhead mirror. Its gayety and beauty delight the flower lover and 
invite the gourmet. 

Mrs. Linthall E. Leatherby, Swampscott. Evergreens about the front 
door and, in the rear, a lawn sloping in natural contours to brilliant an- 
nuals against a boundary fence. On the sides full advantage is taken of 
outcropping ledges as a basis and background for attractive plantings. 

The Society's Silver Medal: 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Knowlton, Auburndale. A garden of iris well 
grown, well labeled, and well kept, set amid great trees and rhododen- 
drons, provides beauty and instruction for neighbors and other flower 
lovers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Wasserman, Chestnut Hill. A most successful plant- 
ing about an attractive, modern house that slopes from one story in front 
to three behind. Features are a natural looking and most efficient screen- 
ing of the rather narrow side boundaries, a shady carpet of ground covers 
on one side, and in the rear a hanging terrace of brick, its railings hidden 
by well trained yews forming a background for flowers and with pyra- 
cantha espaliered against the house. 

The First Church of Christ Scientist in Boston. For a garden whose 
turf, flowers and plantings continue over the years to create an oasis of 
serenity and beauty. 

21 




GARDEN of Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Knowlton, Auburndale, Mass. 

Awarded a Silver Medal 



22 



MUHl 




Illll 






^^^ffif$Mi^^^S 



CBS HYTRON Division, Danvers, Mass. 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 




GARDEN of Mrs. Linthall E. Leatherby, Swampscott, Mass. 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 

23 




KETCHOPULOS Meat Market, Rockport, Mass. 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 




GARDEN of Mr. and Mrs. Max Wasserman, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 

24 







'ftm 1. 




' ' " lill I 



GARDEN of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston, Mass. 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



25 



Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Medal has been awarded to Mrs. Stephen 
V. R. Crosby of Manchester, Mass., for her covered porch overlooking 
a lilac bordered garden on a lower level. From May to September, 
the porch is gay with potted plants. First comes the star jasmine with 
yellow and white marguerites (Boston daisies), followed by large pots 
of geraniums. In June, hibiscus, aucubas and anthuriums are brought 
from the greenhouse with four large camellia trees for a dark accent. 
Then the allamandas put on a show from early July through September. 
Hardy chrysanthemums complete the season. All these plants are beauti- 
fully grown and reflect Mrs. Crosby's deep interest in plants and gardens. 

Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 




Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase, America's most coveted flower 
show trophy, was presented to Mr. Wilfrid Wheeler of Falmouth, Mass., 
by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. This outstanding award was 
given to Mr. Wheeler for a superb planting of holly in a natural 
setting staged at the Society's Annual Chrysanthemum Show. 

The recipient, first Commissioner of Agriculture for Massachusetts, is 
known throughout the country as an outstanding authority on the 
varieties and culture of American holly. For more than twenty years, 
he has been collecting and naming large specimens of holly on Cape 
Cod. The planting, which was staged for Mr. Wheeler at Horticultural 
Hall by Mr. Alexander I. Heimlich of Woburn, noted designer of 
natural landscapes, won high praise from horticulturists throughout the 
East. 

The Burrage Gold Vase was established as an annual award from an 
endowment by the late Albert C. Burrage, President of the Massa- 
chusetts Hortucultural Society from 1921 to 1931. It is given annually 
for the most outstanding exhibit in any of the shows sponsored by the 
Society during a given year. 

26 




HOLLY GARDEN by 

Wilfrid Wheeler, Fal- 
mouth, Mass., staged 
at the 1955 Chrysan- 
themum Show by Al- 
exander I. Heimlich, 
Woburn, Mass. 

Awarded the Albert 
C. Burrage Gold Vase 



One of Mr. Wheeler's 
Prize Winning Hollies 




27 




THE PORCH, overlooking the garden of Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby, 

Manchester, Mass. 
Awarded the Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 




28 



Report of the Library Committee 

During the year 1955, members of the Society used the library 
in various ways. They borrowed 5585 books to read at home. 
They asked for advice on gardening problems, planned and pre- 
pared garden club programs, studied for competition in flower shows 
and garden club federation courses. Some of them were beginners at 
gardening; others were highly skilled amateurs or professionals. Al- 
though many of them live in metropolitan Boston and most of them in 
the New England— New York area, we have sent packages as far away 
as Kentucky, Virginia and the State of .Washington. 

It is a constant pleasure to us that many of our nearby members 
come in or telephone to us, and we want to repeat once more the invita- 
tion to our members everywhere. The library is yours; it contains a 
wealth of information and pleasure to offer you. 

At this time last year, I reported plans for improvements in the read- 
ing room. The ceiling and walls are now freshly painted and the floor 
refinished, and fluorescent lights installed on the ceiling and over the 
book cases. Fresh flowers continue to appear every week. We are plan- 
ning to buy a new charging desk, catalogue cases and other equipment 
this year, and to rearrange the room for greater convenience of our 
readers and staff. 

As part of a bequest, the library received a large collection of paint- 
ings of cultivated orchids, unusually complete as a record of the older 
varieties of odontoglossums and cypripediums. The Secretary of the 
American Orchid Society has asked and been given permission to photo- 
graph these paintings on slides for the use of his Society. In return he is 
giving us expert advice on organizing the collection. 

Once in a while the library adds some rare or unusual book to its 
collection. Our latest acquisition is a copy of a reproduction of 
Dioscorides' "De Materia Medica", which we have been trying to obtain 
for 25 years. It was written in the first century A.D. by an army physi- 
cian, and was the foundation of botanical knowledge in Europe for the 
next fifteen hundred years, having been translated into 12 languages. 
The manuscript reproduced here is by far the best known. It was made 
about the year 512 and is the earliest European record of plants still in 
existence. It has been famous for many centuries both as an early 
historical record and for the beauty of its illustrations, and was (and we 
hope still may be) one of the treasures of the Austrian State Library in 
Vienna. The addition of this work carries our record back over a 
thousand years, and adds an important link in our record of the history 
of botany and of botanical illustration. 

Albert C. Burrage, Chairman 
Committee on the Library 

: % 29 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

The George Robert White Medal of Honor was awarded to Dr. Harold 
Lloyd Lyon, Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii, Director of the Foster 
Gardens, Wahiawa Botanical Garden and Manoa Arboretum, for his 
work of international scope in establishing the sugar and pineapple 
industries in Hawaii, on a firm, scientific and economic basis through 
research in the culture and development of new varieties and methods 
of disease control. Likewise, his leadership in horticulture and botany 
has contributed significantly to the development of Hawaii as a vital 
horticultural center. Dr. Lyon has directed his various projects with the 
support of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association, the Association 
of Hawaiian Pineapple Canners, as well as various governmental agen- 
cies. He is also credited with introducing rare and unusual plants, 
organizing the first Plant Pathology Department to be established by 
any experiment station in the United States and inaugurating a program 
of forestry research for the protection of water sheds in Hawaii. 

Jackson Dawson Medal 

The Jackson Dawson Medal was awarded to Mr. Eugene S. Boerner 
—whose achievements in rose breeding with hybrid teas, and more 
especially with the notably popular floribundas, have earned for him 
wide acclaim from the All American Rose Selections Committee, The 
American Rose Society and amateur gardeners in this country and 
abroad. Mr. Boerner's efforts in obtaining more vigorous plants in 
new colors, with larger blooms of greater substance, and in promoting 
the widespread planting of these hardy roses, have made a notable 
contribution to the garden world. 



Thomas Roland Medal 

The Thomas Roland Medal was awarded to Mr. Frank Reinelt, Capi- 
tola, California, for improving by selection and hybridizing such important 
plants as delphiniums, tuberous-rooted begonias and primulas in the 
noted establishment of Vetterle & Reinelt. He has greatly enlarged the 
commercial scope of horticulture on the West Coast and has made 
possible many outstanding new varieties of these plants for gardens 
all over the world. Mr. Reinelt has been cited by the American Del- 
phinium Society and the American Begonia Society. 



30 




DR. HAROLD L. LYON, left, receives the nation's highest horticul- 
tural award, the George Robert White Medal of Honor, for his agricul- 
tural and horticultural accomplishments during his near-50 years of 
work in the Hawaiian Islands. The Medal was presented by Harold W. 
Knowlton. 



31 




Mrs. Arthur P. Teele 

Boston, Mass. 
Awarded a Gold Medal 



Nakash 

Mr. William Ormiston Roy 

Montreal, Canada 

Awarded a Gold Medal 



The Society's Gold Medals 

The Society's Large Gold Medal was awarded to Mr. William 
Ormiston Roy, distinguished horticulturist and landscape naturalist, 
Montreal, Canada, for a lifetime devoted to assembling a knowledge 
of plants, for designing private gardens, for the development of an 
outstanding collection of woody plants in Montreal's Mount Royal 
Cemetery and for the friendship he has cultivated with horticulturists 
on this continent and throughout Europe. Mr. Roy's contribution to 
horticulture is adequately recorded in his well conceived development 
of the Mount Royal Cemetery in Montreal and in many plantings 
throughout Canada and the United States. During his busy life, he has 
found time to make a notable collection of peonies and he has done 
much to champion the Gaspe Peninsula as a recreational area for those 
suffering from hay fever. 

32 



The Large Gold Medal of the Society was awarded to Mrs. Arthur 
P. Teele of Boston, teacher, writer and lecturer on the fundamentals 
of flower arrangement, for outstanding service to this Society. Since 
1941, Mrs. Teele has conducted classes at Horticultural Hall and has 
sponsored several hundred interested amateurs who have become 
members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. She pioneered 
courses in flower arrangements for apartment dwellers during World 
War II and received wide attention for her novel idea. Her book "Facts 
About Flower Arrangement" has had a wide circulation. 




Briggs 

Eugene S. Boerner 

Newark, N. Y. 

Awarded the Jackson Dawson 

Medal 



Contreras 

Frank Reinelt 

Capitola, California 

Awarded the Thomas Roland 

Medal 



33 




SEASIDE PLANTING staged by Bay State Nurseries, Abington, Mass. 

Awarded a Gold Medal 




REPRODUCTION of a scene in a state park, staged by the Mass. 
Department of Natural Resources at the 1956 Spring Flower Show 

Awarded a Gold Medal 

34 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1955 
The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Mr. Wilfrid Wheeler, Falmouth, for the most outstanding exhibit in 1955. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Dr. Harold Lloyd Lyon, Honolulu, Hawaii, for eminent service in horti- 
culture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Mr. Frank Reinelt, Capitola, California, for exceptional skill in horti- 
culture. 

Jackson Dawson Medal 

Mr. Eugene S. Boerner, Newark, New York, for skill in the science and 
practice of hybridizing roses. 

Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. W. Ormiston Roy, Montreal, Canada, for noteworthy service in horti- 
culture. 
Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Boston, for outstanding service to this Society. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

The First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, for a garden of serenity 

and beauty. 
Mr. & Mrs. Harold W. Knowlton, Auburndale, for a well designed and 

interesting garden. 
Mr. & Mrs. Max Wasserman, Chestnut Hill, for a garden of unusual charm 

and beauty. 

Bronze Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Ketchopulos Market, Rockport, for a charming and unusual market. 
Mrs. Linthall E. Leatherby, for a garden of unusual charm and beauty. 

Garden Certificate 

CBS HYTRON Division, Danvers— large trees, shrubs, lawns and flowers 
blend this modern factory into its rural surroundings. 

The Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby, Manchester, for her covered porch overlooking a 
lilac bordered garden on a lower level. 

The President's Cup 

F. I. Carter & Sons, Tewksbury, for an Arizona Desert Garden, the most 
meritorious exhibit in the Spring Show. 

35 



Gold Medal of the 
Horticultural Society of New York 

National Association of Gardeners, Cape Cod Branch, for a Semi-Formal 
English Garden, the most beautiful exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, North Easton, for an informal exhibit of 
azaleas and rhododendrons, the exhibit showing the highest standard of 
culture in the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Auburndale Garden Club, for the most charming garden club exhibit 
in the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

Chestnut Hill Garden Club, for the exhibit displaying the greatest horti- 
cultural excellence in the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Prize 

The North Shore Horticultural Society, for a Spanish Garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Weston Nurseries, Hopkinton, for a Parterre Garden in the French man- 
ner at the Spring Show. 

The Bulkley Medal of the 
Garden Club of America 

Mr. Alexander Irving Heimlich, Woburn, for an informal exhibit depict- 
ing the Himalayas, an exhibit of special merit and educational value at 
the Spring Show. 

The Beatrix Farrand Silver Bowl 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, West Newbury, for the best exhibit of rhododen- 
drons in the Spring Show. 

American Orchid Society Silver Medal 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for the most meritorious exhibit 
of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Book: "Camellias in the Huntington Gardens" 

Estate of the late Mrs. Theodore E. Brown, Milton, for camellia Mrs. 
Freeman Weiss, best bloom in the show. 

36 



Crystal Vases 

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston, for tulip Marshal Haig, best 

bloom in the show. 
The Merrys, Needham, for daffodil Beersheba, best bloom in the show. 

Gold Medals 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Ames, for an informal exhibit of azaleas and rhodo- 
dendrons at the Spring Show. 

Arnold Arboretum, for an informal exhibit featuring ground covers at the 
Spring Show. 

Arnold Fisher Co., for a display of roses. 

Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for a harvest scene of 
apples. 

Bay State Nurseries, for an Italian Garden at the Spring Show. 

Mr. Ernest Borowski, for a group of azaleas. 

Mr. Ernest Borowski, for a Fuchsia Garden. 

Boston School of Flower Arrangement (Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director), 
for Holiday Decorations. 

Boston School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables and flowers 
from a school garden. 

Boston School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables. 

Breck's, for a Dutch Garden at the Spring Show. 

Breck's, for a display of lilies. 

Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 

Butterworth's, for a group of orchids. 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for an Arizona Desert Garden at the Spring Show. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Cider Hill Greenhouses, York, Maine, for a group of Episcias and Saint- 
paulias at the Spring Show. 

Mr. Edward Dane, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. George E. Taylor, Chair- 
man ) , for a group of flower arrangements based on the theme "Flower 
Arrangements Around the World" at the Spring Show. 

The Gardeners Garden Club (at Philadelphia), for a Kitchen Garden at 
the Spring Show. 

Mr. G. Peabody Gardner, for a group of Schizanthus at the Spring Show. 

Mr. Alexander I. Heimlich, for an informal exhibit depicting the Hima- 
layas at the Spring Show. 

Jamaica Plain 'High School, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Lommerse & Heemskerk, for a display of tulips. 

Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources, for a reproduction of 
a typical scene within our State Parks at the Spring Show. 

37 



Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee 

(Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Chairman), for an exhibit of chrysanthemums 

for indoor decoration. 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee 

(Mrs. Stephen Wheatland, Chairman), for a group of gardens based on 

the theme "Gardening in Sun and Shade" at the Spring Show. 
National Association of Gardeners, Cape Cod Branch, for a Semi-Formal 

English Garden at the Spring Show. 
New England Carnation Growers Association, for the carnation displays 

at the Spring Show. 
New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York, for 

fruit exhibits. 
North Shore Horticultural Society, for a Spanish Garden at the Spring 

Show. 
Mr. R. C. Paine, for a group of winter-flowering begonias. 
Parker Brothers, for combined fruit displays. 

Twin Brook Greenhouses, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Weston Nurseries, for a Parterre Garden in the French manner at the 

Spring Show. 
Mr. Wilfrid Wheeler, for a Cape Cod Scene featuring Holly. 

Silver Medals 

Breck's, for a Chrysanthemum Garden. 

Boston Aquarium Society, for an aquarium exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Mr. Stedman Buttrick, for a display of iris. 

Mr. James Cass, for a collection of lily color plates. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Danielson, for a group of pot plants at the Spring 

Show. 
Estate of the Late Mrs. Theodore E. Brown, for an educational camellia 

display. 
Mr. Thomas Galvin, for a display of dahlias. 
The Greenlaws, for a group of begonias at the Spring Show. 
The Greenlaws, for a Terrace Garden of roses. 
Johnson Bros., for a display of Stephanotis at the Spring Show. 
H. V. Lawrence, Inc., for a Cape Cod Garden at the Spring Show. 
Mr. C. H. Lothrop, for a display of double snapdragons at the Spring 

Show. 
The Merrys, for a display of hemerocallis. 
Middlesex County Beekeepers Association, for an educational beekeeping 

exhibit at the Spring Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. Arno H. Nehrling, for a collection of Leis and Anthuriums. 
Norfolk County Agricultural School, for an informal garden at the Spring 

Show. 
Norumbega Nursery Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

38 



Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, Norristown, Pennsylvania, for a display 

of camellias. 
Old Colony Landscape Service, for an informal garden at the Spring 

Show. 
Oregon Bulb Farms, Gresham, Oregon, for a collection of lilium species. 
Mr. R. C. Paine, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Pine Gardens, for a Front Yard Garden at the Spring Show. 
Mr. C. L. Shride, Seattle, Washington, for the best stalk of named hybrid 

lily. 
Mr. Harold D. Stevenson, for an informal exhibit depicting the Hanging 

Gardens of Babylon at the Spring Show. 
Strawberry Hill, Rhinebeck, New York, for a display of a collection of 

lilies. 
Tow Path Gardens, W. Hartford, Connecticut, for an Informal Oriental 

Garden at the Spring Show. 
Mr. John Truesdale, for a display of miscellaneous garden flowers. 
Wellesley College, Botany Department, for an exhibit of tropical plants 

at the Spring Show. 

Bronze Medals 

Boston School Garden at Woburn, for an exhibit of gourds. 

Junior Gardeners of the Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, for an 
educational display at the Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Department of Public Works, for an exhibit depicting a 
roadside rest area at the Spring Show. 

New England Wild Flower Preservation Society, for an educational ex- 
hibit. 

Mr. John Thibodeau, for a display of miniature spring flowering bulbs. 

United States Department of Agriculture, Bcltsville, Md., for a display of 
hybrid lilies. 

First Class Certificates 

Carnation Majestic, exhibited by Patten and Co., Inc., at the Spring Show. 
Carnation Murray's Calypso Sim, exhibited by Thomas Murray at the 

Spring Show. 
Carnation Salmon Pink, exhibited by Patten and Co., at the Spring Show. 
Chrysanthemum Olnura, exhibited by Vincent De Petris, Grosse Pointe, 

Michigan. 

Awards of Merit 

Specimen Azalea Hybrid, exhibited by Mr. Ernest Borowski. 

Carnation Crimson King, exhibited by Patten and Co., Inc. at the Spring 

Show. 
Hemerocallis Frank Nye, exhibited by the Merrys. 
Hemerocallis Mellow Moon, exhibited by the Merrys. 
Lilium Aurelian Hybrid, exhibited by Dr. E. F. Palmer, Ontario, Canada. 

39 



Lilium Electra, exhibited by Strawberry Hill, Rhinebeck, New York. 

Lilium Empress of China, exhibited by Oregon Bulb Farms, Gresham, 
Oregon. 

Lilium Empress of India, exhibited by Oregon Bulb Farms, Gresham, 
Oregon. 

Lilium Golden Clarion Seedling, exhibited by Oregon Bulb Farms, Gres- 
ham, Oregon. 

Lilium Jillian Wallace, exhibited by Oregon Bulb Farms, Gresham, 
Oregon. 

Rose Capri, exhibited by Arnold Fisher Co. at the Spring Show. 

Rose First Lady, exhibited by Arnold Fisher Co. at the Spring Show. 

Squash Silver Bell, exhibited by Mr. Ernest Borowski. 

Darwin Tulip Lefeber's Favorite, exhibited by Mr. Harold S. Ross. 

Votes of Commendation 

Seedling Apples & Grapes, exhibited by the New York State Agricultural 

Experiment Station, Geneva, New York. 
Rex Begonia Eugene, exhibited by the Merrys. 
Iris Eleanor's Pride, exhibited by Mr. Kenneth Stone. 
Seedling Pears, exhibited by the New York State Agricultural Experiment 

Station, Geneva, New York. 

Cultural Certificates 

Mr. Thomas Allen, for a group of Schizanthus at the Spring Show. 

Mr. Peter Arnott, for Dendrobium Louis Bleriot. 

Mr. Ernest Borowski, for a group of azaleas. 

Mr. Ernest Borowski, for Azalea Edith Stevens. 

Boston School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables. 

Johnson Bros., for a display of Stephanotis at the Spring Show. 

Lommerse & Heemskerk, for a display of tulips. 

Mr. Malcolm Macrae, for a group of cypripediums. 

North Shore Horticultural Society, for a Spanish Garden at the Spring 

Show. 
Dr. and Mrs. S. Lehman Nyce, Norristown, Pennsylvania, for a display of 

camellias. 
Mrs. Edna Roberts, for a group of Episcias and Saintpaulias at the Spring 

Show. 
Mrs. Edna Roberts, for a group of Saintpaulias. 
Mr. Harold S. Ross, for tulip Holland's Glory. 

Votes of Thanks 

Abington Strawberry Nursery, for a strawberry barrel. 
Mrs. J. K. Billingsley, for a flower arrangement. 
Mrs. J. K. Billingsley, for an arrangement of tulips. 
Mr. Albert Brunelle, for a collection of painted driftwood. 

40 



Mrs. A. C. Cobb, for a Chinese primrose. 

Mrs. George S. Coffin, for Corn Iochief. 

Mrs. George S. Coffin, for two plants of Okra. 

Mrs. George S. Coffin, for Shell Beans, King of the Earlies. 

Mrs. George S. Coffin, for Sunflowers, Russian Mammoth. 

Mrs. George Gottwald, for a vase of pussy willows at the Spring Show. 

Jasker Lane Greenhouses, for Camellia reticulata. 

Mr. Martin J. Kelley, for hardy primrose "Lisheen". 

Mr. Martin J. Kelley, for hardy primrose, Polyanthus mixed. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Marcy, for an Iris Corsage. 

Men's Garden Club of Boston, for Praying Mantis Egg Cases. 

Mrs. R. Booer Miller, for radishes. 

Mrs. Olaf Nelson, for four plants of Epiphyllum. 

Mr. Heinrich Rohrbach, for varieties of Salix at the Spring Show. 

Sander & Sons, Belgium, for spikes of Cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

Mr. August Schumacher, Jr., for Indian Corn. 

Miss Catherine Smith, for a spray of Philadelphus. 




THE PRESIDENT'S GALLERY at Horticultural Hall, Boston, Mass. 

41 




THE WOMEN'S Exhibitions Committee Garden in the making at the 
1956 Spring Flower Show 




SOUTHERN GARDEN at the 1956 Spring Flower Show, staged by 
Weston Nurseries, Weston, Mass. 

Awarded the President's Cup 

42 




THE WOMEN'S Exhibitions Committee, under the direction of Mrs. 
Irving C. Wright, Chairman, designed this charming display, featuring 
chrysanthemums indoors, at the 1955 annual Chrysanthemum Show. 

Awarded a Gold Medal 



43 



Report of the Treasurer 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1955 

When i reported to you at our Annual Meeting a year ago I 
hazarded the opinion that our fiscal results for 1955 would be 
considerably more satisfactory than for 1954 when we sustained 
a deficit of approximately $67,000. I am happy to say that my forecast 
has been confirmed although we again operated in tie red. The actual 
figures for purposes of comparison are as follows: For the 12 months 
ended December 31, 1955, the deficit was $29,380.34; the deficit for 

1954 was $66,951.08. Thus the 1955 results were about $37,500 better 
than those I reported to you a year ago— a big step in the right direction 
towards black ink figures. None of us, however, speaking for the officers 
and trustees, will feel really happy and satisfied until deficits are elim- 
inated and until your Treasurer can again report an excess of income over 
outgo, as he has been able to at so many Annual Meetings during the 
past ten years. 

There were several striking and very encouraging aspects about our 

1955 year. For example— your Society's income from its investments 
reached almost $70,000-a figure well ahead of the $66,000 in 1954 and 
far, far ahead of the days when we were accustomed to expect about 
$45,000 of income from our investments. This relatively huge gain as 
against, say ten years ago, has been achieved with a small amount of help 
from the income from new funds added to our endowment which have 
not been large in relation to our total endowment. It has come mostly 
from the ability of our funds to provide us with a steadily increasing in- 
come in the form of augmented dividend disbursements from the stocks 
that we hold. It is also perhaps a matter of more than incidental interest 
that our total securities standing on our books at $865,898 are worth cur- 
rently more than a million dollars in excess of their book value. 

Another high point of the year was the 1955 Spring Show that pro- 
duced close to a record net income of about $71,000, and still another 
evidence of forward progress was a new high for net membership income 
of $44,899 as against $34,750 in 1954. 

In contrast to these high points on the right side of the ledger, our 
magazine Horticulture sustained another serious operating deficit 
amounting to $70,435 as against a deficit of $74,395 in 1954. Now while 
the deficit dropped, it did not decline sufficiently to warrant any com- 
placency about the future of Horticulture although it is only fair to 
state that the worst of our growing pains seem to be over. In view of the 
tremendous gain in circulation (the latest figures reveal a circulation of 
over 80,000) and in view of the reduction in the unit cost of publishing 
the magazine, I for one believe that the 1956 results of Horticulture 

44 



are going to show a really gratifying improvement over 1955; in fact, 
on the basis of the encouraging results thus far in 1956, it seems to me 
that the deficit of last year is going to be cut down very drastically. 

At the risk of being labeled a chronic optimist, I think the improvement 
that Horticulture is likely to produce this year will go a long way to- 
wards offsetting the reduced income from our 1956 Spring Show that is 
attributable entirely to the extraordinarily bad weather that prevailed 
during most of the Show week. In any event, I wish to assure all of you 
that the officers and trustees of your Society are extremely conscious of 
the need for bringing income and outgo into a better balance than has 
prevailed over the past two years and that they are bending their best 
efforts to achieve this desirable end. 

Respectfully submitted 

Stedman Buttrick 



Report of the Treasurer 
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AT DECEMBER 31, 1955 

Assets 

Cash In Banks and On Hand $ 19,530.03 

Accounts Receivable— "Horticulture" .... 14,323.16 

Accounts Receivable $ 15,320.31 

Deduct: Allowance for losses in collec- 
tion 997.15 

$ 14,323.16 

Notes Receivable "Horticulture" 600.00 

Accounts Receivable— Other 119.25 

Investments at Book Value 865,898.56 

Eleanor Tudor Trust 7,942.50 

Capital Assets 606,195.92 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to buildings 61,050.82 
Library 46,580.47 

$606,195.92 

cz ■ 

Deferred Charges 16,892.06 

Spring Show, 1956 $ 4,408.06 

Prepaid Insurance and Expense 8,272.58 

Inventory of Books, Binders, etc 4,211.42 

$ 16,892.06 

$1,531,921.48 
45 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities $ 64,348.85 

Accounts Payable $ 58,843.52 

Taxes Withheld 1,961.35 

Accrued Commissions— "Horticulture" . 2,320.60 

Social Security Taxes Accrued 169.62 

Credit Balances Accounts Receivable. . 1,053.76 

$ 64,348.85 



Deferred Income 442.00 

Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 8,715.28 

Principal $ 7,942.50 

Unexpended Income 772.78 



$ 8,715.28 



Sundry Funds 825,347.26 

Special Uses: 

Principal $241,298.66 

Unexpended Income 4,680.57 

$245,979.23 
General Uses: 

Principal 579,368.03 

$825,347.26 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 149,250.56 

Balance, January 1, 1955 $148,466.88 

Add: Net gain on securities sold 783.68 

$149,250.56 

Deficit (earned) 80,707.17 

$1,531,921.48 



46 






REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income 

1955 1954 

Income from Investments $ 69,889.26 $ 65,975.01 

Membership Fees (after member's sub- 
scription to Horticulture) 44,899.73 34,750.78 

Rentals 10,691.19 11,134.53 

Spring Show 113,607.12 95,610.87 

125th Anniversary and Loan Exhibit 12,036.97 

Autumn Show 3,152.87 

"Horticulture" Loss 70,435.88 74,395.12 

Other Receipts 1,457.66 413.75 



$166,956.21 $121,452.85 

Expenditures 1955 1954 

Building Expenses $ 42,652.78 $ 40,608.09 

Library Expenses 16,319.63 16,512.33 

Office and General Salaries and Expenses . 79,047.80 75,267.64 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses 4,863.09 3,975.79 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates: 

Lectures paid from General Funds. . . . 944.20 1,070.00 
Prices, medals and certificates paid from 

General Funds 2,394.24 2,665.91 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from 

Spring Show 42,478.55 41,660.02 

Medals, Lectures, etc. paid from Restricted 

Funds 1,737.24 1,541.74 

Awards from Shows paid from Restricted 

Funds 5,610.93 5,329.93 

$196,048.46 $188,631.45 

Net Loss-All Funds $ 29,092.25 $ 67,178.60 

Elimination of Expenses Included Above 

Paid From Income of Restricted Funds 9,355.87 9,071.48 

$ 19,736.38 $ 58,107.12 
Elimination of Income Included Above 

Allocated to Restricted Funds $ 9,643.96 $ 8,843.96 

Net Loss-General Funds $ 29,380.34 $ 66,951.08 



47 




THE LIBRARY. Top picture was taken before the new lighting was 
installed. Lower one shows the distinct improvement, which always 
brings forth favorable comment from our many visitors. The staff en- 
joy it too. 




48 



Books Added to the Library 

May 1,1955-May 1,1956 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Adriance, G. W. & Brison, F. R. Propagation of horticultural plants. New 

York, 1955 
Better homes and gardens. Gardening ideas; rev. ed. Des Moines, 1954 
Carvel, Etienne. Traite complet sur les pepinieres; 2d ed. Paris, 1805 
Coombs, R. H. Soil warming by electricity. New York, 1955 
Downey, E. F. Improving your garden through soil management. New 

York, 1955 
Everett, T. H. Gardening handbook; rev. ed. New York, 1955 
Fillmore, R. A. Green thumbs, the Canadian gardening book. Toronto, 1953 
Gunnison, O. M. Practical gardening. Garden City, 1955 
Hadfield, Miles. Pioneers in gardening. Lond., 1955 
Hamilton, G. H. A gardener's source book. Toronto, 1953 
Home gardening encyclopedia; new ed. Lond., 1955 
John Innes Horticultural Institution. The fruit, the seed and the soil; 3d ed. 

Lond., 1954 
Morton, J. & K. My green thumb record and inventory of plants, shrubs and 

trees. Coral Gables, Fla., 194-? 
Peigelbeck, Will. The complete book of gardening and lawn care. New York, 

1956 
Pirone, P. P. What's new in gardening. Garden City, 1956 
Rodale, J. I. Organic gardening. Garden City, 1955 
Smail, H. A. A history of the Eleanor Squire Memorial Library of the Garden 

Center of Greater Cleveland, (ms) Cleveland, O., 1955 
Stout, Ruth. How to have a green thumb without an aching back. New 

York, 1955 
Sutton & Sons. The culture of vegetables and flowers from seeds and roots; 

21st ed. Reading, Eng., 1955 
Taylor, M. M. Your garden notebook. Salem, Ore., 1955 
Wells, J. S. Plant propagation practices. New York, 1955 
Whitney, C. M., ed. The Bermuda garden. Bermuda, 1955 
Woodbourne, Harry. The green kingdom. Portland, Me., 1955 
Wright, R. C. M. Plant propagation and garden practices. New York, 1956 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Soils 

The Care and feeding of garden plants, written by D. G. Aldrich, jr. and oth- 
ers. Wash., D. C. 1955 
Easy, Ben. Practical organic gardening. Lond., 1955 
Hainsworth, P. H. Agriculture, a new approach. Lond., 1954 
Lawrence, W. J. C. Seed and potting composts; 4th ed. Lond., 1950 

. Soil sterilization. Lond., 1956 

Thome, D. W. & Peterson, H. B. Irrigated soils, their fertility and manage- 
ment; 2d ed. New York, 1954 

49 



Diseases and pests 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Handbook on pests and diseases. Brooklyn, N. Y., 

1955 
Frear, D. H., comp. Pesticide handbook 1955. State College, Pa., 1955 
Muenscher, W. C. Weeds; 2d ed. New York, 1955 
Peairs, L. M. & Davidson, R. H. Insect pests of farm, garden, and orchard; 5th 

ed. New York, 1956 
Rose, G. J. Crop protection. Lond., 1955 
Wescott, Cynthia. The gardener's bug book, completely rewritten and reset. 

New York, 1956 
Wickenden, Leonard. Our daily poison. New York, 1956 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 
Barber, A. C. Annual flowers. Lond., 1954 
Chidamian, Claude. Bonsai, miniature trees. New York, 1955 
Edwards, Alexander. Rock gardens; 4th ed. Lond., 1955 
Fletcher, H. V. L. The water garden. Lond., 1951 
Hellyer, A. G. L. Flowers in colour. Lond., 1955 
Rockwell, F. F. and Grayson, E. C. The complete book of annuals. New 

York, 1955 
Sunset magazine. Sunset seasonal garden guide. San Francisco, 1955 
Symons-Jeune, B. H. B. Natural rock gardening; rev. ed. Lond., 1955 
Taylor, Norman. Wild flower gardening. New York, 1955 
Walker, C. F. The alpine garden. Lond., 1955 

Greenhouse and house plants 

Bertrand, A. Indoor plants and how to grow them. Kent, Eng., 1955 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. House plants, a handbook. Brooklyn, N. Y., 1954 
Chabot, Ernest. The new greenhouse gardening for everyone. New York, 

1955 
Chase, J. L. H. & Pouncy, A. J. Soil block gardening. Lond., 1955 
Gardens & gardening. Growing under glass. Lond., 1955 
Goold-Adams, Deenagh. The unheated greenhouse. Lond., 1955 
Potter, C. H. Flowering pot plants. Chicago, 1954 
Reynolds, Ray. Grow extra dollars at home. Armonk, N. Y., 1952 
Rockwell, F. F. House plants. Garden City, 1953 
Schulz, Peggie. Growing plants under artificial light. New York, 1955 

Monographs 
American Rhododendron Society. Rhododendrons, 1956. Portland, Ore., 1956 
American Rose Society. The American rose annual, v. 40-41 Harrisburg, Pa., 

1955-1956 

. What every rose grower should know; 5th ed. Harrisburg, Pa., 1955 

Barnes, A. T. Dahlia grower's treasury. Lond., 1954 

Carey, R. G. African violet handbook for exhibitors and judges. Knoxville, 

Tenn., 1955 
Curwood, J. E. Commercial chrysanthemum culture. Lond., 1955 
Cusdin, J. A. Tulip forcing. Lond., 1953 
Cutak, Ladislaus. Cactus guide. New York, 1956 
Edwards, J. P. How to grow roses. Menlo Park, Cal., 1955 
Gerbing, G. C. Camellias. Fernandina, Fla., 1950 

50 



Germain Seed and Plant Co. The Queen Elizabeth rose. Los Angeles, 1954 

Gray, Alec. Miniature daffodils. Lond., 1955 

Hennessey, Roy. Hennessey on roses; 3d ed. St. Helens, Ore., 1954 

Hume, H. H. Camellias in America; rev. ed. Harrisburg, Pa., 1955 

Jacobsen, H. Succulent plants. Lond., 1955 

Jenkins, D. H. The complete book of roses. New York, 1956 

Johnstone, G. H. Asiatic magnolias in cultivation. Lond., 1955 

Kelway, James. Garden paeonies. London, 1954 

Krauss, H. K. Geraniums for home and garden. New York, 1955 

Lamb, Edgar. The illustrated reference on cacti & other succulents. London, 

1955 
Levieuze, Tiburce. a rosieres (Aube) Catalogue, 1913. Geneve, 1913 
Meachem, W. L. An easy guide to African violets. New York, 1956 
North American Lily Society. Lily yearbook, 1955 
Northen, R. T. Orchids as house plants. New York, 1955 
Oregon Orchid Society, Inc. Your first orchids and how to grow them; rev. ed. 

Portland, 1955 
Palmer, Kenneth. Hibiscus unlimited. St. Petersburg, Fla., 1954 
Royal Horticultural Society, London. The daffodil and tulip yearbook, 1956 

. The lily year book, 1956 

Sanders, St. Albans. Sanders' list of orchid hybrids, addendum III. Lond., 

1952-54 
Sunset magazine. How to install and care for your lawn. Menlo Park, Cal., 

1955 
Thomas, A. S. Better roses; 2d ed. Melbourne, 1955 
Wyman, Donald. Crab apples for America; 2d ed. 1955 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HERBS 

Knott, J. E. Vegetable growing; 5th ed. Philadelphia, 1955 

Muenscher, W. C. & Rice, M. A. Garden spice and wild pot-herbs. Ithaca, 

N. Y., 1955 
Pearson, C. E. Vegetable growing. London, 1953 
Royal Horticultural Society, London. The fruit year book, 1955-1956 
Shoemaker, J. A. Small-fruit culture; 3d ed. New York, 1955 
Walkden, G. B. Cloche gardening. London, 1955 
Work, P. & Carew, J. Vegetable production and marketing; 2d ed. New 

York, 1955 

AGRICULTURE 

Sauer, C. O. Agricultural origins and dispersals. New York, 1952 
Sechrist, E. L. Amateur beekeeping. New York, 1955 

NATURAL HISTORY 

Beecher, W. J. Attracting birds to your back-yard. Fond du Lac, Wise, 1955 
Brown, Vinson. How to make a home nature museum. Boston, 1955 
Hood, M. V. Outdoor hazards, real and fancied. New York, 1955 
Richardson, Wyman. The house on Nauset Marsh. New York, 1955 
Sherman, C. L., ed. & comp. Nature's wonders in full color. Garden City, 

1956 
Visher, S. S. Climatic atlas of the United States. Cambridge, 1954 

51 



COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES 

Allen, S. W. Conserving natural resources. New York, 1955 

Brantley, C. O. Opportunities in horticulture; rev. ed. New York, 1953 

Bromfield, Louis. From my experience. New York, 1955 

Dale, Tom and Carter, V. G. Topsoil and civilization. Norman, Okla., 1955 

McCubbin, W. A. The plant quarantine problem. Waltham, Mass., 1954 

Taylor, S. M. The gardeners are coming. New York, 1954 

Wood, W. T. & M. S. Flower show know-how. Asheville, N. C, 1954 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Ammann, Gustav. Landscape gardens. Zurich, 1955 

Baumann, Ernst. New gardens. Zurich, 1955 

Bushey, D. J. A guide to home landscaping. New York, 1956 

Church, T. D. Gardens are for people. New York, 1955 

Deering, R. B. Planning the garden. California, 1953 

Gladstone, Bernard. The complete book of garden and outdoor lighting. 

New York, 1956 
Heath, R. E. Shrubs for the rock garden and alpine house. Lond., 1955 
Hellyer, A. G. L., ed. Herbaceous borders. Lond., 1955 
Hochman, Louis. How to build patios, terraces, barbecues, walks, fences, 

awnings, gates. Greenwich, Conn., 1955 
House & Garden. House & garden's new complete book of gardens. New 

York, 1955 
Malkin, R. S. How to landscape your own home. New York, 1955 
Morton, J. F. Some useful and ornamental plants of the Caribbean gardens. 

Naples, Fla., 1955 
Sunset magazine. Sunset landscaping for western living. Menlo Park., Cal., 

1956 
Van Melle, P. J. Shrubs and trees for the small place; rev. ed. New York, 

1955 
Ward, F. K. Berried treasure. London, 1954 
Wyman, Donald. Ground cover plants. New York, 1956 



BOTANY 

General 

Bry, J. T. de. Florilegium novum. Oppenheim, 1611 

Dioscorides. Codex Aniciae Iulianae picturis illustratus. Leiden, 1906 2 vols. 

Eigsti, O. J. & Dustin, P., jr. Colchicine in agriculture, medicine, biology and 

chemistry. Ames, la., 1955 
Franklin, T. B. Climates in miniature. New York, 1955 
George, Wilma. Elementary genetics. London, 1951 
Hortus sanitatis (major). An early version of Hortus sanitatis; a recent 

bibliographical discovery by Noel Hudson. London, 1954 
Hylander, C. J. The world of plant life; ed. 2. New York, 1956 
Kessler, G. M. Fruits, vegetables and flowers. Minneapolis, 1955 
Romero, J. B. The botanical lore of the California Indians. New York, 1954 
Spaulding, Perley. A bibliographical history of botany at St. Louis, Missouri, 

1909 

52 



Monographs 

Bastin, Harold. Plants without flowers. New York, 1955 

Goodspeed, T. H. The genus nicotiana. Waltham, Mass., 1954 

Hawkes, A. D. The major kinds of palms. Coconut Grove, Fla., 1955 

Moreton, C. O. Old carnations & pinks. London, 1955 

Pohl, R. W. How to know the grasses. Dubuque, la., 1954 

Sterling, Dorothy. The story of mosses, ferns and mushrooms. Garden City, 

1955 
Tobler, F. Die gattung hedera. Jena, 1912 
Wherry, E. T. The genus phlox. Philadelphia, 1955 
Withering, W. An account of the foxglove. Birmingham, Eng., 1948 repr. 

Floras— U. S. 

Benson, L. & Darrow, R. A. The trees and shrubs of the southwestern deserts. 

Tucson, 1954 
Harrington, H. D. Manual of the plants of Colorado. Denver, 1954 
Hitchcock, C. L. Vascular plants of the Pacific Northwest, pt. 5: Compositae. 

Seattle, 1955 
Kieran, John. An introduction to nature. Garden City, 1955 
Lundell, C. L., ed. Flora of Texas. Dallas, 1955 
Mathews, F. S. Field book of American wild flowers; rev. ed. New York, 

1955 
Rosendahl, C. O. Trees and shrubs of the upper Midwest. Minneapolis, 1955 

1955 

Floras— Other countries 

Bond, T. E. T. Wild flowers of the Ceylon Hills. London, 1953 
Degener, Otto. Flora Hawaiiensis; 2d ed. Honolulu, 1946 
Grigson, Geoffrey. The Englishman's flora. London, 1956 
Ross-Craig, Stella. Drawings of British plants, pt. 8. London, 1955 

ESSAYS 

Boyle, E. V. Ros rosarum ex horto poetarum. London, 1885 

Hazel, M. F. The romance of trees in fact and fancy. Washington, D. C, 

1955 
Lisle, Clifton. Pastures new. New York, 1955 

MacLeod, Katherine. Bellingrath and other famous gardens. New York, 1955 
Sackville-West, V. M. In your garden again. London, 1955 

. More for your garden. London, 1955 

Walahfrid Strabo. Hortulus, or The little garden. Wembly Hill, Eng., 1923 

repr. 

FINE ARTS 

Graves, M. E. Art of color and design; 2d ed. New York, 1951 

. Color fundamentals. New York, 1952 

Marcus, M. F. Flower painting by the great masters. New York, 1954 
Roche, J. P. Photographing your flowers. New York, 1954 

FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 

Aldridge, D. M. Make your own corsage. Philadelphia, 1955 
Allen, E. G. Japanese flower arrangement; a complete primer; 2d ed. Phila- 
delphia, 1955 
Ashberry, Anne. Miniature flowers and vases. New York, 1955 

53 



Babcock, M. R. First aid for flowers. New York, 1954 

Bezat, Mrs. J. Through the years. Minneapolis, 1955 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Handbook on flower arrangement. Brooklyn, 

N. Y., 1955 
Carrick, Margaret. Creative flower arranging. New York, 1955 
Clements, Julie. First steps with flowers. London, 1955 
Cyphers, E. H., ed. Fruit and vegetable arrangements. New York, 1955 

. Giving and getting awards for flower arrangement. New York, 1956 

Dodson, Margaret. An easy guide to color for flower arranging. New York, 

1956 
Farrall, Lois. Handbook of floral art. London, 1955 
Hayes, N. G. Modern dry arrangements. Berkeley, Calif., 1955 
Iwata, M. Japanese flower arrangement. New York, 1955 
Kasperski, V. R. How to make cut flowers last. New York, 1956 
Living with flowers, vol. 1-4. Lansing, Mich., 1952-1955 
Lochry, M. A. Corsage of pods and cones. Seattle, Wash., 1955 
McClinton, K. M. Flower arrangement in the church; rev. ed. New York, 

1954 
Roberts, P. E. Party decorations for Christmas and other occasions. New 

York, 1955 
Schlumpf, R. W. Corsage manual. Houston, Texas, 1953 
Schuster, R. F. The miracle of the flowers. Cincinnati, 1956 
Spry, Constance. How to do the flowers. London, 1954 
Stevenson, Violet. Dried flowers for decorating. London, 1955 
Wood, M. S. Old and new in flower arrangement. Macon, Ga., 1955 



BIOGRAPHY 

American men of science; 9th ed. New York, 1955 

Dakin, S. B. The perennial adventure; a tribute to Alice Eastwood. San 

Francisco, 1954 
Hubbard, E. S. Horticultural Society personalities. New York, 195-? 
Hunt, R. M. William Penn horticulturist. Pittsburg, 1953 



TRAVEL AND PLANT HUNTING 

Audubon Society of the District of Columbia. Washington, city in the woods. 

1954 
Fleming, John. Scottish country houses and gardens. London, 1954 
Hussey, C. English country houses open to the public; 2d ed. rev. London. 

1953 
Jackson, Robert, ed. Beautiful gardens of the world. London, 1953 
McEacharn, Neil. The Villa Taranto. London, 1954 
McKelvey, S. D. Botanical exploration of the trans-Mississippi West, 1790- 

1850. Jamaica Plain, Mass., 1955 
Merrill, E. D. The botany of Cook's voyages. Waltham, Mass., 1954 
Moore, J. T. Cincinnati parks. Cincinnati, 1953 
Peterson, R. T. & Fisher, James. Wild America. Boston, 1955 
Shepherd, J. C. & Jellicoe, G. A. Italian gardens of the Renaissance. London, 

1954 
Swiss Foundation for Alpine Research. The mountain world, 1954 

54 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Great Britain. Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries. A selected and classified 
list of books relating to agriculture, horticulture, etc.; 3d ed. London, 1954 
Plesch, A. Bibilotheque Arpad Plesch. Monte Carlo, 1954 
Skillen, M. E. (and others). Words into type. New York, 1948 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

Bulla, C. R. The poppy seeds. New York, 1955 

Downer, M. L. The flower. New York, 1955 

Kinney, R. R. Guide to gardening with young people. New York, 1955 

Kirkus, Virginia. The first book of gardening. New York, 1956 

Pistorius, Anna. What tree is it? New York, 1955 

Selsam, M. E. The plants we eat. New York, 1955 

Smith, F. S. The first book of conservation. New York, 1954 

Stefferud, Alfred. The wonders of seeds. New York, 1956 



GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts to the 

library from the following donors: 

Boutell, Frank J. 

Boyle, E. V. Ros rosarum ex horto poetarum: Dew of the ever-living rose 
gathered from the poets' gardens. 1885 
Crosby, Alfred W. 

Nicholson, George, ed. The illustrated dictionary of gardening. 1887-89 
8 vols. 

Schneider, George. The book of choice ferns. 1892-94 3 vols. 
Harrold, Elisabeth Sears 

Greene, H. B. Wild flowers from the Holy Land. 1895 
Heimlich, Alexander. 

Swiss Foundation for Alpine Research. The mountain world. 1954 
Herb Society of America in memory of Frances Torrey Norton. 

Plictho de larte de tentori. 1548 

II Ricettario medicinale. 1567 
Hussellbee, Richard. 

Oregon Orchid Society. Your first orchids and how to grow them; rev. ed. 
1955 
King, Mrs. Francis, Estate of. 

Rubio i Tuduri, N. M. Gardens of Barcelona. 1929 
McKelvey, Mrs. Susan Delano. 

Dorrance, A. Green cargoes. 

Hale, S. J. Flora's interpreter. 

Lovell, J. H. The flower and the bee. 

McKelvey, S. D. Botanical exploration of the trans-Mississippi West, 1790- 
1850. 1955 

Quinn, V. Seeds, their place in life and legend. 

Wright, R. Gardener's bed-book. 
McLanathan, Richard B. K. 

Munting, Abraham. Naauwkewige beschryving der aardgewassen. 1680 

55 



Museum of Fine Arts. Asiatic Dept. 

Hyo, Ichiran. Peonies. 1897 
Museum of Fine Arts. Print Dept. 

Langlois, Francois. Livre des fleurs: two prints (iris and narcissus) 
Nehrling, Mr. & Mrs. Arno H. 

Morton, J. F. Some useful and ornamental plants of the Caribbean Gardens. 
1955 
Parcher, Emily Seaber. 

Parcher, E. S. Shady gardens. 1955 
Peasley, Mrs. Harriet. 

Crook, H. C. Campanulas. 1951 
Perkins, Mrs. John Carroll. 

Garden Club of America. Bulletin. 1922-1936 

Royal Horticultural Society. Journal. 1936-1949 
Potter, Mrs. Murray A. 

Conder, Josiah. The flowers of Japan and the art of floral arrangement. 
1891 

Keinen kwacho giva fu. 4 vols. 

Seizan goryu ikebana tebiki kusa. 5 vols. 

Shoryo kiden ikebana hitori keeko. 4 vols. 
Ross Harold S. 

Parsons, F. T. D. According to season. 1894 
Wellman, Sargent from the estate of Miss Katherine Wellman. 

American Rose Society. American rose annual, 1918, 1922, 1924-1954 

National Rose Society. Rose annual, 1930-1941 

Collection of nursery catalogs. 
Whittier, Nathaniel in memory of Mrs. Charles Woodbury Whittier 

Garden Club of America. Gardens of colony and state. 2 vol. 1931-34 
World Friendship House, Boston. 

Horticultural diary for India. 1956 
Young, Mrs. Sibylla. 

Flora's interpreter; 9th ed. 1840 



DO 




rt* 



*j*i 



\M %-. 



■:i h 



An illustration from famous Juliana Anicia Codex of Materia Medica 
of Dioscorides, recently acquired by the library. 

A Botanical Treasure 

The book that guided plant study for 16 centuries 

y T? sj he library of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, greatest of 
its kind in the country, was recently enhanced by the addition of 
-^ two large volumes which deserve more notice than the passing 
tribute of an acquisitions listing. They are a facsimile of Juliana Anicia 
Codex of the Materia Medica of Dioscorides, handsomely reproduced 
from the unique original in the State Library at Vienna. 

57 



Dioscorides was a Greek physician, born in Asia Minor, who served 
with the Roman army in the first century of our era. A man of learning, 
he travelled widely in his studies of plants, which then were the only 
sources of medicines, and greatly increased the number of those that were 
known. Doubtless for the guidance of other doctors and medical students, 
he compiled his notes into a book which remained the standard botanical 
authority for 16 centuries, and the works of the earliest modern botanists 
were in the form of commentaries upon it. It is therefore of prime im- 
portance in horticultural history. It also forms one of the foundations of 
botanical nomenclature. 

Its standing in 16th century England, as in other countries, is seen in 
the rules drawn up for his fellows by a leading London Apothecary, a 
cousin of Queen Anne Boleyn, as "His garden must be at hand, with 
plenty of herbs and seeds and roots. He must read Dioscorides". 

By the 6th century, when the Anicia Codex was made, the book was 
old, famous and indispensable to a physician. All the copies then in exist- 
ence were, of course, written by hand, and they were not all illustrated, 
as the Codex is. Very possibly the first copies were, because Dioscorides 
copied some of the earlier books of Cratevus, who was a botanist, author 
and artist in the first century B.C., and it is known that his book was illus- 
trated. Cratevus was physician to Mithridates Eupator, king of Pontus, 
himself a considerable botanist in his search for plants that would pro- 
vide antidotes to poison. "Mithridates, he died old," says A. E. Housman. 
Time has spared to us nothing of the book of Cratevus, but he appears 
in one of the drawings in the Codex, and some of its other drawings, be- 
ing of an earlier style than the Byzantine, are believed to have been 
copied from him. 

It was a turbulent world in the early 6th century. The unity of the vast 
Roman empire had gone. Barbarian states were growing up within its 
bounds— the Visigoths in Gaul, the Huns in central Europe, the Teutonic 
Vandals in north Africa. Italy was in confusion and no fewer than nine 
emperors of the west were proclaimed at Rome within 20 years. One of 
them was Flavius Anicius Olybrius, a wealthy senator from Constan- 
tinople, who wore the purple for a brief seven months' reign in the year 
472. 

Constantinople, the city of Constantine the Great, who built it round 
the ancient Byzantium, was then and for centuries later the eastern capi- 
tal and a center of art and learning. In it lived the lady Anicia Juliana, 
daughter of the emperor, a Christian and given to good works. Very pos- 
sibly she commissioned, about the year 510, the manuscript which now 
bears her name as a gift to a physician or school. It was prepared as a 
codex, that is, a book made of folded sheets rather than the older and 
clumsier roll on which the first Dioscorides manuscripts were written. 

Seven centuries later it was seen in a local monastery by the Italian 
scholar Giovanni Aurispa, who was collecting Greek manuscripts. This 
one he did not succeed in getting, nor did O. G. de Busbecq, the intro- 
ducer of the tulip into Europe, who in 1562 found it in the hands of a 

58 







Another illustration from Juliana Anicia Codex of Materia Medica of 
Dioscorides, added to the library recently. 

son of the late court physician. Busbecq was then ambassador from Fer- 
dinand, emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, to Suleiman the Magnificent, 
the reigning Turk in Constantinople. It seems probable that he persuaded 
his master to buy the Codex, which thus reached what was the Imperial 
Library in Vienna, now the State Library. This is its permanent home, 
though it was looted by the Italians at the end of World War I, but after- 
wards returned. 



Francis C. Coulter 
Orange, Connecticut 



59 




Visitors enjoying one of the exhibits at the 1956 Spring Flower Show 




60 



F 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 

-n^ruit and Flower Mission has completed eighty-seven years of 
friendly service in Greater Boston. Since its beginning in 1869, 
volunteers have been of vital importance in carrying on the work. 
The interest and support of many groups and individuals has kept this 
unique work alive and growing each year. 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society has given many opportunities 
for growth in the use of this office for thirty-one years. We appreciate 
and acknowledge the comforts and courtesies which we enjoy, especially 
the recent installation of modern lighting. Hundreds of nursing home and 
hospital patients and shut-ins living alone have received flowers after the 
flower shows, through the kindness of the exhibitors. Fresh vegetables 
from the Harvest Show have given variety to meals for many, who sorely 
need this change of diet. 

Seven hundred thirty-four hampers and cartons of flowers, fruits and 
vegetables were received by seven distributing centers during the sum- 
mer. Twenty-five communities entered the work this year. Freight 
changes, excessive heat and in some towns, floods, contributed to the 
loss of ninety hampers from the figure of last year. 

Six hundred thirty-seven baskets and trays were distributed during the 
holiday seasons. One hundred fifty begonia plants were sent to recipients 
of Nursing Homes and to shut-ins living alone, at Easter. Each Christmas 
basket contained one or more gifts. Notes of thanks, expressed in many 
ways, told of the joy these messengers of thought bring to one who is 
alone and no longer able to take part in the activities to which they had 
been accustomed. 

Two members of the Horticultural Society have given six of our elderly 
friends the treat of the lovely Spring Flower Show. One member has 
given the unusual gift of a membership which will enable several to 
enjoy the lectures and shows held at Horticultural Hall. 

Our program, at Boston State Hospital, with one ward of mentally ill 
women, is now in the sixth year of operation. Monthly visits during the 
winter, providing entertainment and refreshments and six summer outings 
by bus, is cited by the hospital as one of the best forms of therapy for 
these patients. About eighty-five per cent of this ward do not have 
visitors. Bringing the community to them, instead of setting them apart, 
has created an interest which is not possible within the hospital confines. 
Our efforts are recognized each year by the Massachusetts Association 
of Mental Health. 

We gratefully acknowledge a debt of gratitude to the volunteers who 
have given many hours caring for flowers after the shows and during the 
holiday seasons and to the railroads and baggage men for the courtesy 
and interest in handling the hampers all summer. To our drivers and to 
groups and individuals who have remembered our needs at any time 
through the year, we extend our heartfelt "thanks". 

Esther L. Camfield 
Executive Secretary 

61 



NECROLOGY 

A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, whose 
deaths were reported to the Membership Secretary, during the year. 



Miss Emma S. Allbright 

Miss Evelyn L. Alley 

Mr. Frank H. Allison 

Mrs. Walter A. Amann 

Mr. Edward I. Bacon 

Mrs. George B. Baker 

Miss Mary P. Barnes 

Mrs. John W. Bartol 

Miss Ina A. Bickford 

Mr. Robert Payne Bigelow 

Mr. Frank E. Billings 

Mrs. Frederick P. Bowden 

Mr. John.D. Brewer 

Mrs. Josiah H. Brown 

Mrs. Harry B. Burley 

Mr. George William Butterworth 

Mrs. Bessie R. Buxton 

Miss Emma L. Byam 

Mrs. Arthur W. Carr 

Mrs. Warren Chapman 

Mrs. Grace B. Clark 

Mr. Rodman Colton 

Mrs. Marcus A. Coolddge 

Mrs. John T. Cooper 

Miss E. Gertrude Copeland 

Mr. Guy W. Cox 

Mr. Harry Parsons Cross 

Mr. Benjamin W. Crowninshield 

Miss Carrie E. Daggett 

Miss Florence W. Davis 

Mr. Joseph P. Donovan 

Mrs. Samuel S. Drury 

Dr. John F. Dunn 

Mr. Harris D. Eaton 

Dr. Martin Edwards 

Miss Marion Winslow Emerson 

Mrs. James V. Farrell 

Mrs. William G. Ford 

Mr. Charles H. W. Foster 

Mr. Harry L. French 



Mrs. George F. Fuller 

Mrs. Gertrude F. Given 

Mrs. H. F. Gleason 

Mr. Geoffrey D. Goodale 

Mrs. Charles B. Gordon 

Mrs. Margaret W. Gorman 

Mrs. Charles H. Gray 

Mr. Henry F. Grout 

Mr. Clyde C. Hartney 

Mrs. Clarissa Haselden 

Mrs. D. C. Haskell 

Mr. Charles S. Hawkins 

Mr. Edward H. Heath 

Mrs. Stephen W. Higgins 

Mrs. F. Howard Hinckley 

Mr. Max Hoffman 

Mrs. Henry Hornblower 

Mr. Benjamin Howe 

Miss Marion E. Howe 

Mr. Cecil K. Hughes 

Mrs. Charles Jackman 

Mr. Philip S. Jamieson 

Mrs. Reginald M. Johnson 

Mr. Robert B. Keene 

Miss Jeannie B. Kenrick 

Mrs. Alfred Krall 

Mr. John Philip Lane 

Mr. Arthur Clifton Leavitt 

Miss Edith B. Leith 

Mr. John Loschi 

Mr. John R. Macomber 

Mrs. Bessie R. Mansfield 

Mr. Robert A. McCaughry 

Mrs. Ethel McDonald 

Mr. James Methven 

Mrs. Hattie M. Matthews 

Rev. Frederick Mooney 

Mr. Harry L. Moore 

Mrs. Frederick S. Moseley 

Mr. Andrew W. Nelson 



62 



NECROLOGY 



Mrs. Harriet Nichols 
Mr. Edward Parker 
Mr. Frank H. Powell 
Mrs. Arthur Saville Roe 
Mrs. Alfred Paul Rogers 
Mrs. Charles P. Roundy 
Miss A. Gertrude Sanderson 
Mr. H. W. Schuneman 
Mrs. Frank H. Sellman 
Mr. Henry M. Shrever 
Mrs. E. A. Smith 
Mrs. George Edmund Smith 
Mrs. William G. Snow 
Mrs. Erwin Spoo 
Mrs. J. Sidney Stone 



Mrs. S. A. Strong 
Mrs. J. Louis Taylor 
Miss Louise P. Taylor 
Mr. Hollis O. Thomas 
Mrs. George a. Thorne 
Miss Frances B. Tracy 
Mrs. H. W. Underwood 
Mr. Leighton S. Voorhees 
Miss Katharine F. Wellman 
Mrs. Belle N. Weston 
Miss Bessie L. Whiteman 
Mrs. Charles W. Whittier 
Mrs. Sidney Winslow 
Mr. Fred M. Woodard 



Honorary Members 



1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Walter D. Brownell, Little Compton, Rhode Island 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Garle, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Rorert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law Olmsted, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. A. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. O. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, Chatham, Massachusetts 

1945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

63 



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